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Research Papers

Fretting Wear Modeling of Cylindrical Line Contact in Plane-Strain Borne by the Finite Element Method

[+] Author and Article Information
Huaidong Yang

G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mail: yanghuaidong@gatech.edu

Itzhak Green

Fellow ASME
G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering,
Georgia Institute of Technology,
Atlanta, GA 30332
e-mail: green@gatech.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Applied Mechanics Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Applied Mechanics. Manuscript received January 8, 2019; final manuscript received February 28, 2019; published online April 12, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Shaoxing Qu.

J. Appl. Mech 86(6), 061012 (Apr 12, 2019) (12 pages) Paper No: JAM-19-1014; doi: 10.1115/1.4043074 History: Received January 08, 2019; Accepted February 28, 2019

This is the first study to develop an empirical formulation to predict fretting wear (volume removal) under frictional conditions for plane-strain line contacts as borne out by the finite element analysis (FEA). The contact is between a deformable half-cylinder rubbing against a deformable flat block. The FEA is guided by detailed physical conceptions, with results that subsequently lead to the methodical modeling of fretting wear. The materials in contact are first set to steel/steel, then to Alloy617/Alloy617, and finally to copper/copper. Various coefficients of friction (COFs) and the Archard Wear Model are applied to the interface. Initially, pure elastic conditions are investigated. The theoretical predictions for the wear volume at the end of the partial slip condition in unidirectional sliding contact agree very well with the FEA results. The empirical formulation for the initial gross slip distance is constructed, again revealing results that are in good agreement with those obtained from the FEA for different materials and for various scales. The Timoshenko beam theory and the tangential loading analysis of a half elastic space are used to approximate the deflection of the half-cylinder and the flat block, respectively. That theory supports well the empirical formulation, matching closely the corresponding FEA results. The empirical formulation of the wear volume for a general cycle under fretting motion is then established. The results are shown to be valid for different materials and various COFs when compared with the FEA results. Finally, plasticity is introduced to the model, shown to cause two phenomena, namely junction growth and larger tangential deformations. Wear is shown to either increase or decrease depending on the combined influences of these two phenomena.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

The loading condition and dimensions of the model

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Fig. 2

The distribution of tangential surface traction of the cylindrical contact under a tangential force, Q/L < μ(P/L)

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Fig. 3

The model in ansys 17.1

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Fig. 4

The normalized sliding distance at inception of gross slip under P* = 1 with μ = 0.3 for three material cases

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Fig. 5

The schematic of the sliding distance

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Fig. 6

The normalized initial gross slip distance under different normalized normal loads with different COFs for the FEA results and fitting functions, Eq. (16), for steel/steel

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Fig. 7

The dimensional initial gross slip distance under different normal loads with μ = 0.3 for the FEA results and fitting functions results for steel/steel (for R = 0.05 m, 0.5 m, and 5 m), for Alloy617/Alloy617, and for Cu/Cu (for R = 0.5 m)

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Fig. 8

The deflections of the half-cylinder at the initiation of the gross slip from FEA and Eq. (A8) with for P* = 1 at different COFs

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Fig. 9

The tangential displacement on the surface of the block at P* = 1 with μ = 0.3 from FEA and half elastic space estimation

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Fig. 10

The normalized wear volume at the initiation of the gross slip, V0/Vc, from FEA and Eq. (19) at different normal loads and COFs with K = 10−4 for steel/steel

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Fig. 11

The normalized wear volume at the initiation of gross slip, V0/Vc, from FEA and Eq. (19) at different normal loads with µ = 0.3 for steel/steel, Alloy617/Alloy617, and copper/copper

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Fig. 12

The FEA results of the evolution of normalized wear volume during three cycles of fretting motion at P* = 1 for steel/steel in elastic contact

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Fig. 13

The wear volume for a general cycle of fretting motion at elastic condition for different normal loads and COFs, comparing FEA and theoretical predictions for steel/steel (for R = 0.5 m)

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Fig. 14

The wear volume for a general cycle of fretting motion at elastic condition with µ = 0.3 under different normal loads from FEA and theoretical predictions for steel/steel, Alloy617/Alloy617, and copper/copper (for R = 0.5 m)

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Fig. 15

The evolution of wear volume at elastic and plastic conditions with different COFs under P* = 1 for steel/steel during one cycle of fretting motion (for R = 0.5 m).

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Fig. 16

The evolution of wear volume at elastic and plastic conditions with μ = 0.3 under P* = 3 for steel/steel during one cycle of fretting motion

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Fig. 17

(a) The loading condition of the half-cylinder as a Timoshenko beam at slip onset and (b) zoomed in the contact region

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Fig. 18

The schematic of the loading condition for estimation of the moment on the tip of the half-cylinder, M0/L

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