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RESEARCH PAPERS

J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):217-223. doi:10.1115/1.3157600.

The dispersion of a small quantity of a solute initially injected into a round tube in which steady-state laminar flow exists is critically examined. It is shown that the mean solute concentration profile is far from being symmetric at small dimensionless times after injection. The mean concentration and the axial location at the peak of the profile are presented in detail as functions of time for flow with various Peclet numbers. It is suggested that such results may be useful for determining either the molecular diffusion coefficient or the mean flow velocity or both from experimental measurements. A previously established criterion in terms of the Peclet number for determining the minimum dimensionless time required for applying Taylor’s theory of dispersion is graphically illustrated. Although the complete generalized dispersion equation of Gill’s model is exact, the truncated two-term form of it with time-dependent coefficients is exact only asymptotically at large values of time; however, at small Peclet numbers, the two-term approximation is shown graphically to be reasonably satisfactory over all values of time. The exact series solution is compared with the solution of Tseng and Besant through the use of Fourier transform.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):224-228. doi:10.1115/1.3157601.

The accelerated motion of a liquid droplet is investigated analytically. The equation of motion is developed through an analysis of the internal and external fluid motions. Response to step changes in applied force and external fluid velocity are determined. Oscillating forces and velocities are treated and frequency response characteristics found. In the appropriate limits, the results reduce to the known behavior of bubbles or rigid particles.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):229-238. doi:10.1115/1.3157602.

The problems of sluice gate and sharp crested weir were studied through hodograph transformations. Numerical calculations of the stream function in terms of hodograph variables were carried out after the hodographs were transformed into rectangles. Results were compared with the available experimental data and other results of calculations. Favorable agreement in all cases substantiated the fact that the method of hodograph transformation is effective in dealing with these problems strongly influenced by gravitation.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):239-242. doi:10.1115/1.3157603.

The velocity field for creeping viscous flow around a solid sphere due to a spherically symmetric thermal field is determined and a simple thermal generalization of Stokes’ formula is obtained. The velocity field due to an instantaneous heat source at the center of the sphere is obtained in closed form and an application to the storage of heat-generating nuclear waste is discussed.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):243-248. doi:10.1115/1.3157604.

A theoretical investigation into the linear, spatial instability of the developing flow in a rigid circular pipe, incorporating the effects of nonparallelism of the main flow, has been made at several axial locations. The velocity profile in the developing flow region is obtained by a finite-difference method assuming uniform flow at the entry to the pipe. For the stability analysis, the continuity and momentum equations have been integrated separately using fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme and applying selectively the Gram-Schmidt orthonormalization procedure to circumvent the parasitic error-growth problem. It is found that the critical frequency, obtained from different growth rates, decreases first sharply and then gradually with increasing X , where X = x/aR = X/R; x being the streamwise distance measured from the pipe inlet, a being the radius of the pipe, and R the Reynolds number based on a and average velocity of flow. However, the critical Reynolds number versus X curves pass through a minima. The minimum critical Reynolds number corresponding to gψ(X , O), the growth rate of stream function at the pipe axis, to gE (X ), the growth rate of energy density, and to the parallel flow theory are 9700 at X = 0.00325, 11,000 at X = 0.0035, and 11,700 at X = 0.0035, respectively. It is found that the actual developing flow remains unstable over a larger inlet length of the pipe than its parallel-flow approximate. The first instability of the flow on the basis of gψ(X , O), gE (X ) and the parallel flow theory, is found to occur in the range 30 ≤ X ≤ 36, 35 ≤ X ≤ 43, and 36 ≤ X ≤ 45, respectively. The critical Reynolds numbers obtained on the basis of gψ(X , O) are closest to the experimental values.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):249-254. doi:10.1115/1.3157605.

Numerical and asymptotic solutions of the similarity equations governing the laminar compressible rotating flow near the edge of a finite disk are presented for a wide range of the Prandtl and Eckert numbers and the disk-to-external flow ratios of azimuthal velocity and temperature. By appropriate transformations, the compressible flow is reduced to a formulation similar to that of the incompressible flow. Wall heating and dissipation effects are shown to be equivalent to an increment of the velocity of the disk in the sense opposite to that of the outer flow. In the limit of small velocity or temperature difference between the disk and the outer flow, the solutions show how an Ekman layer is started at the edge.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):255-258. doi:10.1115/1.3157606.

Unsteady two-dimensional flow of a viscous incompressible and electrically conducting fluid near a moving porous plate of infinite extent in presence of a transverse magnetic field is investigated. Solution of the problem in closed form is obtained with the help of Laplace transform technique, when the plate is moving with a velocity which is an arbitrary function of time and the magnetic Prandtl number is unity. Three particular cases of physical interest are also discussed.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):259-264. doi:10.1115/1.3157607.

The infiltration of a fluid into a dry poro-elastic body, of infinite extent, from its cylindrical or spherical cavity and the resulting mechanical behaviors are investigated. Since the problem is a moving boundary problem, and therefore, an essentially nonlinear one, the finite-difference scheme with the aid of the boundary fixing method is applied to obtain the solution. The results thus obtained for sandstone are compared with those for a porous rigid body as well as with those in a situation where a fluid pervades the whole body from the outset. These comparisons show that the extent of the infiltration front into the body is adequately predicted by the rigid skeleton model and that the actual stress distribution is remarkably different from that which exists if fluid pervades the whole body from the outset.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):265-271. doi:10.1115/1.3157608.

Approximation procedures for the solution of convection-diffusion equations, occurring in various physical problems, are considered. Several finite-element algorithms based on singular-perturbation methods are proposed for the solution of these equations. A method of variational matched asymptotic expansions is employed to develop shape functions which are particularly useful when convection effects dominate diffusion effects in these problems. When these shape functions are used, in conjunction with the standard Galerkin method, to solve convection-diffusion equations, increased solution accuracy is obtained. Numerical results for various one-dimensional problems are presented to establish the workability of the developed methods.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):272-275. doi:10.1115/1.3157609.

Approximation procedures for the solution of two-dimensional convection-diffusion problems are introduced. In these procedures finite-element techniques are utilized. The developed solution algorithms are based on a variational method of matched asymptotic expansions. When these techniques are used in conjunction with standard Galerkin methods, to solve convection-diffusion equations, highly accurate solutions are obtained. Numerical results for certain two-dimensional problems are presented to establish the accuracy of the proposed procedures.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):276-284. doi:10.1115/1.3157610.

A theory of anisotropic viscoplasticity is developed. It is compared with and shown to reduce to existing theories under appropriate restrictions. The theory accommodates anisotropic hardening laws which, by means of Lagrangian mappings in stress space, incorporate experimentally observed yield surface distortion as well as kinematic and isotropic flow-induced changes. The theory is applied to the prediction of flow surfaces in tension-torsion space.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):285-296. doi:10.1115/1.3157611.

In the context of a purely mechanical, rate-type theory of elastic-plastic materials and utilizing a strain space formulation introduced in [1], this paper is concerned mainly with developments pertaining to strain-hardening behavior consisting of three distinct types of material response, namely, hardening, softening, and perfectly plastic behavior. It is shown that such strain-hardening behavior may be characterized by a rate-independent quotient of quantities occurring in the loading criteria of strain space and the corresponding loading conditions of stress space. With the use of special constitutive equations, the predictive capability of the results obtained are illustrated for strain-hardening response and saturation hardening in a uniaxial tension test.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):297-301. doi:10.1115/1.3157612.

Constitutive equations of elastoplastic materials with anisotropic hardening and elastic-plastic transition are presented by introducing three similar surfaces, i.e., a loading surface on which a current stress exists, a subyield surface limiting a size of the loading surface and a distinct-yield surface representing a fully plastic state. The assumption of similarity of these surfaces leads the derived equations to remarkably simple forms. Also a more general rule of the kinematic hardening for the distinct-yield surface is incorporated into the constitutive equations. While they seem to be applicable to various materials, special constitutive equations of metals, for example, are derived from them and are compared with experimental data on a cyclic uniaxial loading of aluminum. A close correlation between theory and experiment is observed in this comparison.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):302-308. doi:10.1115/1.3157613.

The shadow spots which are obtained in using the optical method of caustics to experimentally determine dynamic stress-intensity factors are usually interpreted on the basis of a static elastic crack model. In this paper, an attempt is made to include both crack-tip plasticity and inertial effects in the analysis underlying the use of the method in reflection. For dynamic crack propagation in the two-dimensional tensile mode which is accompanied by a Dugdale-Barenblatt line plastic zone, the predicted caustic curves and corresponding initial curves are studied within the framework of plane stress and small scale yielding conditions. These curves are found to have geometrical features which are quite different from those for purely elastic crack growth. Estimates are made of the range of system parameters for which plasticity and inertia effects should be included in data analysis when using the method of caustics. For example, it is found that the error introduced through the neglect of plasticity effects in the analysis of data will be small as long as the distance from the crack tip to the initial curve ahead of the tip is more than about twice the plastic zone size. Also, it is found that the error introduced through the neglect of inertial effects will be small as long as the crack speed is less than about 20 percent of the longitudinal wave speed.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):309-312. doi:10.1115/1.3157614.

An integral transform solution is developed to reduce the problem of determining the stress-intensity factor of a narrow three-dimensional rectangular crack to the solution of a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind. The crack is assumed to be embedded in an infinite elastic solid subjected to normal loading. Numerical results are presented to indicate a reduction in the value of the stress-intensity factor from the plane strain case. For an elongated rectangular crack the plane-strain stress-intensity factor is recovered.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):313-319. doi:10.1115/1.3157615.

In this paper, we study the effects of the elasticity and proximity of a circular inclusion upon the fracture angle of a bent crack in the surrounding matrix. The medium is assumed to be in plane strain, and loaded in uniaxial tension by stresses acting perpendicular to the main branch of the crack. A comparison is made of fracture-angle predictions based upon current theories governing the initial fracture angle.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):320-326. doi:10.1115/1.3157616.

The exact value of Sanders’ path-independent, energy-release rate integral I for an infinite, bent elastic slab containing an elliptic hole is shown to be approximated by its value from classical plate theory to within a relative error of O(h/c)F(e), where h is the thickness, c is the semimajor axis of the ellipse, and F is a function of the eccentricity e. This result is based on Golden’veiser’s analysis of three-dimensional edge effects in plates, as developed by van der Heijden. As the elliptic hole approaches a crack, F(e)~In (1−e). However, this limit is physically meaningless, because Golden’veiser’s analysis assumes that h is small compared to the minimum radius of curvature of the ellipse. Using Knowles and Wang’s analysis of the stresses in a cracked plate predicted by Reissner’s theory, we show that the relative error in computing I from classical plate theory is only O(h/c)In (h/c), where c is the semicrack length. Our results suggest that classical plate and shell theories are entirely adequate for predicting crack growth, within the limitations of applying any elastic theory to an inherently inelastic phenomenon.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):327-330. doi:10.1115/1.3157617.

Boussinesq-Papkovich stress functions are used to determine three-dimensional closed form solutions for steady creep around a spherical cavity or rigid inclusion in a half space under gravity loading. The ratio of cavity depth to radius is assumed to be greater than 5, and the flow law of the half space is linear, which allows for solution in terms of a finite number of spherical harmonics. Numerical results are given to show the influence of the lateral stress component at infinity, the stabilizing effect of internal cavity pressure, and buoyancy forces associated with the motion of a rigid inclusion.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):331-338. doi:10.1115/1.3157618.

In this paper an adhesively bonded lap joint is analyzed by assuming that the adherends are elastic and the adhesive is linearly viscoelastic. After formulating the general problem a specific example for two identical adherends bonded through a three parameter viscoelastic solid adhesive is considered. The standard Laplace transform technique is used to solve the problem. The stress distribution in the adhesive layer is calculated for three different external loads namely, membrane loading, bending, and transverse shear loading. The results indicate that the peak value of the normal stress in the adhesive is not only consistently higher than the corresponding shear stress but also decays slower.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):339-344. doi:10.1115/1.3157619.

Considered is a sample of cohesionless granular material, in which the individual granules are regarded rigid, and which is subjected to overall macroscopic average stresses. On the basis of the principle of virtual work, and by an examination of the manner by which adjacent granules transmit forces through their contacts, a general representation is established for the macroscopic stresses in terms of the volume average of the (tensorial) product of the contact forces and the vectors which connect the centroids of adjacent contacting granules. Then the corresponding kinematics is examined and the overall macroscopic deformation rate and spin tensors are developed in terms of the volume average of relevant microscopic kinematical variables. As an illustration of the application of the general expressions developed, two explicit macroscopic results are deduced: (1) a dilatancy equation which both qualitatively and quantitatively seems to be in accord with experimental observation, and (2) a noncoaxiality equation which seems to support the vertex plasticity model. Since the development is based on a microstructural consideration, all material coefficients entering the results have well-defined physical interpretations.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):345-350. doi:10.1115/1.3157620.

Based on experimental evidence and thermodynamics it will be shown that the stored energy function of an ideal rubber membrane is determined by the entropy alone. The membrane is represented by a two-dimensional surface for the purposes of thermodynamics, and its thickness is taken into account by a scalar parameter so that incompressibility of the membrane can be described. The entropy of the membrane is calculated from a kinetic model and hence results the surface stress as a function of temperature and deformation for arbitrary shape of the membrane.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):351-356. doi:10.1115/1.3157621.

After obtaining the relations between incremental stresses and incremental strains, we analyzed the instability problem stated in the title on the basis of Biot’s mechanics of incremental deformations. The slab, made of a hypothetical transversely isotropic compressible elastic material, is assumed to be stronger in its transverse direction than in its axial direction. The analysis shows that, no matter what the anisotropy strength of the slab is or its thickness is, it can become unstable under tension as well as under compression. The critical load is higher for the stronger anisotropy in the compressive case, while it is lower for the stronger anisotropy in the tensile case. In other words, the reinforcement in the “wrong” direction weakens the slab under tension with respect to its stability. Furthermore, the weakly anisotropic slab can become unstable only after the axial resultant force reaches its maximum, while the strongly anisotropic slab can lose its stability before the force reaches its maximum.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):357-360. doi:10.1115/1.3157622.

For large deformations, the strain-energy density function for a neo-Hookean membrane is dominated by the sum of squares of the two principal stretch ratios. This property reduces the displacement equations of equilibrium for the class of problems considered to three uncoupled linear equations. The nonlinear coupling appears only in the algebraic stress calculations. In light of the scarcity of exact solutions to nontrivial problems, the approximate but explicit solutions obtained here should be of some practical value.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):361-367. doi:10.1115/1.3157623.

One of the experimental findings on short-fiber reinforced composite materials is that the fiber-ends act as a crack initiator. The effect of the fiber-end crack on the overall stiffness and the strength of the composite are investigated here. A particular emphasis is placed upon the weakening longitudinal Young’s modulus by the fiber-end crack which is assumed to be penny-shaped. The energy release rate of the penny-shaped crack at the fiber-end under a uniaxial applied stress is also calculated for a fracture criterion. It is assumed in our theoretical model that short-fibers are all aligned in the loading direction and the penny-shaped crack at the fiber-end extends in the direction perpendicular to the fiber axis. Our analytical technique is a combination of Eshelby’s equivalent inclusion method and Mori-Tanaka’s back stress analysis so that our results are valid even for large volume fraction of fibers.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):371-376. doi:10.1115/1.3157625.

A finite-element analysis is carried out for small-amplitude free vibration of laminated, anisotropic, rectangular plates having arbitrary boundary conditions, finite thickness shear moduli, rotatory inertia, and bimodulus action (different elastic properties depending upon whether the fiber-direction strain is tensile or compressive). The element has five degrees of freedom, three displacements and two slope functions, per node. An exact closed-form solution is also presented for the special case of freely supported single-layer orthotropic and two-layer, cross-ply plates. This solution provides a benchmark to evaluate the validity of the finite-element analysis. Both solutions are compared with numerical results existing in the literature for special cases (all for ordinary, not bimodulus, materials), and good agreement is obtained.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):377-382. doi:10.1115/1.3157626.

This paper develops a comprehensive higher-order theory for flexural motions of a thin elastic plate, in which the effect of finite thickness of the plate and that of small but finite deformation are taken into account. Based on the theory of nonlinear elasticity for a homogeneous and isotropic solid, the nonlinear equations for the flexural motions coupled with the extensional motions are systematically derived by the moment asymptotic expansion method. Denoting by ε the ratio of the thickness of the plate to a characteristic wavelength of flexural motions, an order of characteristic deflection is assumed to be ε2 and that of a characteristic strain ε3 . The displacement and stress components are sought consistently up to the next higher-order terms than those in the classical theory.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):383-390. doi:10.1115/1.3157627.

This paper deals with, as a continuation of Part 1 of this series, the boundary-layer theory for flexural motions of a thin elastic plate. In the framework of the higher-order theory developed in Part 1, three independent boundary conditions at the edge of the plate are too many to be imposed on the essentially fourth order differential equations. To overcome this difficulty, a boundary layer appearing in a narrow region adjacent to the edge is introduced. Using the matched asymptotic expansion method, uniformly valid solutions for a full plate problem are sought. The boundary-layer problem consists of the torsion problem and the plane problem. Three types of the edge conditions are treated, the built-in edge, the free edge, and the hinged edge. Depending on the type of edge condition, the nature of the boundary layer is characterized. After solving the boundary-layer problem, “reduced” boundary conditions relevant to the higher-order theory are established.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):391-398. doi:10.1115/1.3157628.

The dynamic stability of clamped, truncated conical shells under periodic torsion is analyzed by the Galerkin method in conjunction with Hsu’s results. The instability regions of practical importance are clarified for relatively low frequency ranges. Numerical results indicate that under the purely periodic torsion only the combination instability region exists but that with an increase in the static torsion the principal instability region becomes most significant. The relative openness of the instability regions is found to depend sensitively on the circumferential phase difference of two vibration modes excited simultaneously at the resonance with the same circumferential wave number.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):399-403. doi:10.1115/1.3157629.

On the basis of the dynamic version of the nonlinear von Karman equations, a theoretical analysis is performed on the elastic instability of a uniformly heated, thin, annular plate which has suffered a finite axisymmetric deformation due to lateral pressure. The linear free vibration problems around the finite axisymmetric deformation of the plate are solved by a finite-difference method. By examining the frequency spectrum with various asymmetric modes, the critical temperature rise under which the axisymmetric deformation becomes unstable due to the bifurcation buckling is determined, which is found to jump up to 7.2 times within a range of very small lateral pressure.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):404-410. doi:10.1115/1.3157630.

Analytical and experimental studies were made of the dynamic response of a system with a geometric nonlinearity, which is encountered in many practical engineering applications. An exact solution was derived for the steady-state motion of a viscously damped Bernoulli-Euler beam with an unsymmetric geometric nonlinearity, under the action of harmonic excitation. Experimental measurements of a mechanical model under harmonic as well as random excitation verified the analytical findings. The effect of various dimensionless parameters on the system response was determined.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):411-418. doi:10.1115/1.3157631.

A method for analyzing the earthquake response of deformable, cylindrical liquid storage tanks is presented. The method is based on superposition of the free lateral vibrational modes obtained by a finite-element approach and a boundary solution technique. The accuracy of such modes has been confirmed by vibration tests of full-scale tanks. Special attention is given to the cos θ-type modes for which there is a single cosine wave of deflection in the circumferential direction. The response of deformable tanks to known ground motions is then compared with that of similar rigid tanks to assess the influence of wall flexibility on their seismic behavior. In addition, detailed numerical examples are presented to illustrate the variation of the seismic response of two different classes of tanks, namely, “tall” and “broad” tanks. Finally, the significance of the cos nθ-type modes in the earthquake response analysis of irregular tanks is briefly discussed.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):419-424. doi:10.1115/1.3157632.

The dynamic response of a simple beam excited at its midspan by the action of a turbomachine secured to it, is investigated in detail. The forcing function includes transients at startup or shutdown. Effects of the shear deformation, rotatory inertia, and the internal viscous damping, which may depend on the frequency, are considered individually as well as in combined forms. The results indicate that the maximum amplitude of vibration is highly dependent on the acceleration rate through the critical frequency. There is also an apparent shift in its position as compared to the classical resonance frequency. Influences of shear deformation and rotatory inertia are significant when the supporting structure (or foundation) is relatively massive.

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

TECHNICAL BRIEFS

J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):425-426. doi:10.1115/1.3157633.
Abstract
Topics: Pressure , Arches , Buckling
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):426-428. doi:10.1115/1.3157634.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):429-431. doi:10.1115/1.3157636.
Abstract
Topics: Creep , Stress
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):431-436. doi:10.1115/1.3157637.
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):436-438. doi:10.1115/1.3157638.
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):438-439. doi:10.1115/1.3157639.
Abstract
Topics: Friction
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):439-441. doi:10.1115/1.3157640.
Abstract
Topics: Creep , Cylinders
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):442-445. doi:10.1115/1.3157642.
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

DISCUSSIONS

Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

ERRATA

BOOK REVIEWS

J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):450. doi:10.1115/1.3157648.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):450. doi:10.1115/1.3157649.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):450-451. doi:10.1115/1.3157650.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Topics: Rheology
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):451. doi:10.1115/1.3157651.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Topics: Creep
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):451-452. doi:10.1115/1.3157652.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):452-453. doi:10.1115/1.3157653.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Topics: Solids , Dislocations
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):453. doi:10.1115/1.3157654.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster
J. Appl. Mech. 1981;48(2):453-454. doi:10.1115/1.3157655.
FREE TO VIEW
Abstract
Commentary by Dr. Valentin Fuster

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