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Technical Brief

Design of an Impedance-Graded Metallic Composite System as a Protective Mechanism for Concrete Structures

[+] Author and Article Information
P. L. N. Fernando

Faculty of Engineering and IT,
School of Civil Engineering,
The University of Sydney,
Darlington, NSW 2006, Australia
e-mail: paththige.fernando@sydney.edu.au

Damith Mohotti

Faculty of Engineering and IT,
School of Civil Engineering,
The University of Sydney,
Darlington, NSW 2006, Australia
e-mail: damith.mohotti@sydney.edu.au

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Applied Mechanics Division of ASME for publication in the Journal of Applied Mechanics. Manuscript received March 22, 2019; final manuscript received May 27, 2019; published online June 10, 2019. Assoc. Editor: Shengping Shen.

J. Appl. Mech 86(9), 094501 (Jun 10, 2019) (6 pages) Paper No: JAM-19-1126; doi: 10.1115/1.4043886 History: Received March 22, 2019; Accepted May 27, 2019

Protecting concrete structures from high energetic dynamic events such as blasts and impact is a major concern, in both civil- and military-related applications. Most conventional techniques fail to counter the unpredictable nature of dynamic loads, as well as the complex response of structures due to stress wave propagation. Hence, this paper explores the possibility of using a functionally graded—according to impedance—metallic composite system as a protective mechanism to a concrete structure. An analytical framework was developed using matlab, based on elastic and shock wave propagation theories, especially incorporating multiple interactions within the composite system, as well as reflections of free surfaces. A numerical analysis was carried out using the advanced finite element code LS-DYNA. The main objective of this paper was to compare the performance of the composite system against the conventional monolithic system.

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References

Li, Q. M., Reid, S. R., Wen, H. M., and Telford, A. R., 2005, “Local Impact Effects of Hard Missiles on Concrete Targets,” Int. J. Impact Eng., 32(1–4), pp. 224–284. [CrossRef]
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Meyers, M. A., 2007, Dynamic Behavior of Materials, Wiley, New York.
Fernando, P. L. N., Mohotti, D., and Remennikov, A., 2019, “An Innovative Approach of Using Continuous Impedance-Graded Metallic Composite System for Attenuation of Stress Waves,” ASME J. Appl. Mech., 86(6), p. 061002. [CrossRef]
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Livermore Software Technology Corporation, 2007, “LS-DYNA Keyword User’s Manual,” Version R9.0, CA.

Figures

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Fig. 1

(a) Monolithic and (b) IGMM system as protective mechanisms for a concrete structure

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Fig. 2

Stress development in concrete from elastic waves

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Fig. 3

Stress development in concrete from shock waves

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Fig. 4

Development of numerical models

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Fig. 5

Compressive stress developed at the front face of the concrete due to elastic waves

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Fig. 6

Compressive stress developed at the front face of the concrete due to shock waves

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Fig. 7

Distance–time plots within the protective structure for (a) monolithic and (b) composite configurations

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Fig. 8

Distance–time plots within the concrete for (a) monolithic and (b) composite configurations

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Fig. 9

Maximum damage parameters at the front and back faces of the concrete from the numerical analysis

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