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Computational Modeling of Dynamically Initiated Instabilities and Implosion of Underwater Cylindrical Structures in a Confined Environment

[+] Author and Article Information
Emily Guzas

Naval Undersea Warfare Center (Division Newport), Platform and Payload Integration Department, Analysis and Technology Branch, 1176 Howell Street, Newport, RI 02841
emily.guzas@navy.mil

Sachin Gupta

Dynamic Photo Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881
gupsac@gmail.com

Joseph M Ambrico

Naval Undersea Warfare Center (Division Newport), Platform and Payload Integration Department, Analysis and Technology Branch, 1176 Howell Street, Newport, RI 02841
joseph.ambrico@navy.mil

James M. LeBlanc

Naval Undersea Warfare Center (Division Newport), Platform and Payload Integration Department, Analysis and Technology Branch, 1176 Howell Street, Newport, RI 02841
james.m.leblanc@navy.mil

Arun Shukla

Dynamic Photo Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Systems Engineering, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881
shuklaa@uri.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4042046 History: Received September 26, 2018; Revised November 19, 2018

Abstract

This paper details a numerical study of the stability of a cylinder under combined hydrostatic and dynamic pressure loading within a tubular environment. Simulations are executed using a Eulerian-Lagrangian scheme, with the DYSMAS code, to model the (1) structural response of an unstiffened cylindrical shell to dynamic pressure and (2) the fluid flow within the surrounding environment during the collapse. Simulations involve an aluminum 6061-T6 cylinder structure with a length-to-diameter ratio of 9.6. The cylinder is 31.8 mm (1.25-in) in diameter, and concentrically and longitudinally centered within the outer tube. Simulations are run at four hydrostatic tank pressures, categorized by percentage of collapse pressure, Pc: 66% Pc, 80% Pc, 85% Pc, and 90%Pc. The shell is subjected to shock loading created by the detonation of a blasting cap at a standoff to the structure. Simulated pressure histories are compared to experimental pressure data at gage locations. The simulations produce the same overall result for three of four cases, survive/implode. For the 80%Pc case, the overall result differs in that the specimen in the experiment survives but the simulated cylinder implodes. The discrepancy between the overall experimental result and corresponding simulation is not deemed a failure for the 80%Pc case; instead, this signifies a transitional case for the dynamic stability of the shell structure (collapse is sensitive to small deviations from assumed conditions).

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