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research-article

An acoustomechanical constitutive model of gel considering cavitation effect in exposure to ultrasound

[+] Author and Article Information
Qinyi Huang

School of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, People's Republic of China
qinyi_huang@126.com

Yihui Pan

School of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, People's Republic of China
083633@tongji.edu.cn

Zheng Zhong

School of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, People's Republic of China; School of Science, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055, People's Republic of China
zhongk@tongji.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040777 History: Received May 22, 2018; Revised June 29, 2018

Abstract

In this paper, an acoustomechanical constitutive model is developed to describe the heating effect of a tissue-mimicking gel by cavitation in exposure to high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). An internal variable, representing the evolution of cavitation process, is introduced into the Helmholtz free energy under the framework of thermodynamics that combines the acoustic radiation stress theory and the nonlinear elasticity theory together. Thus, the internal variable is related to the cavitation process and the mechanical energy dissipation of a tissue-mimicking gel from a macroscopic viewpoint. Since the temperature rise of cavitation phenomenon is more remarkable than that of heating waves, the temperature inside the tissue-mimicking gel rises rapidly mainly due to large amounts of cavitation bubbles. This phenomenon can be quantitatively described by the present model, which fits the existing experimental data well.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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