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research-article

Characterizing the Stimulated Reservoir Volume during Hydraulic Fracturing-Connecting the Pressure Fall-off Phase to the Geomechanics of Fracturing

[+] Author and Article Information
Erfan Sarvaramini

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3G1
esarvaramini@uwaterloo.ca

Maurice Dusseault

Earth and Environmental Sciences Department, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3G1
mauriceduw@gmail.com

Robert Gracie

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave W, Waterloo, ON Canada N2L 3G1
rgracie@uwaterloo.ca

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4040479 History: Received March 16, 2018; Revised May 30, 2018

Abstract

Microseismic imaging of the hydraulic fracturing operation in the naturally fractured rocks confirms the existence of a Stimulated Volume (SV) of enhanced permeability. The simulation and characterization of the SV evolution is uniquely challenging given the uncertainty in the nature of the rock mass fabrics as well as the complex fracturing behavior of shear and tensile nature, irreversible plastic deformation and damage. In this article, the simulation of the SV evolution is achieved using a non-local poro-mechanical plasticity model. Effects of the natural fracture network are incorporated via a non-local plasticity characteristic length, l. A non-local Drucker-Prager failure model is implemented in the framework of the Biot's theory using a new implicit C^{0} finite element method. First, the behavior of a representative injection scenario is simulated and resulting SV is assessed. Next, the post-shut-in behavior of the SV is analyzed using the pressure and pressure derivative plots. A bi-linear flow regime is observed and it is used to estimate the flow capacity of the SV. The results show that the flow capacity of the SV increases as l decreases (i.e., as the SV behaves more like a single hydraulic fracture); however, for, 0.1m <=l<=1m the calculated flow capacity indicates that the conductivity of the SV is finite. Lastly, it is observed that as l tends to zero, the flow capacity of the SV tends to infinity and the SV behaves like a single infinitely conducting fracture.

Copyright (c) 2018 by ASME
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