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research-article

Mechanics of Periodic Film Cracking in Bilayer Structures under Stretching

[+] Author and Article Information
Xianhong MENG

School of Aeronautic Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191, China
mxh@buaa.edu.cn

Zihao WANG

School of Aeronautic Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191, ChinaAcademy of Opto-Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100094, China
wangzihao@buaa.edu.cn

Sandra Vinnikova

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, U.S.A.
sandra.vinnikova@okstate.edu

Shuodao WANG

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, U.S.A.
shuodao.wang@okstate.edu

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4039757 History: Received February 22, 2018; Revised March 23, 2018

Abstract

In a bilayer structure consists of a stiff film bonded to a soft substrate, the stress in the film is much larger when the rigidity of the film is much higher than that of the substrate. So that film cracking is a common phenomenon in bilayer structures such as flexible electronics and biological tissues. In this paper, a theoretical model is developed to analyze the normal stress distribution in the structure to explain the mechanism of the formation of periodic crack patterns. The effects of geometrical and material parameters are systematically discussed. The analytical result agrees well with Finite Element Analysis (FEA), and the prediction of spacing between cracks agrees with experiments from the literature.

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