0
research-article

Concurrent rupture of two molecular bonds in series: implications for dynamic force spectroscopy

[+] Author and Article Information
Lin Ji

Department of Engineering Mechanics, Key Laboratory of Soft Machines and Smart Devices of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027, China
linji900108@163.com

Yuan Lin

Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
ylin@hku.hk

Jin Qian

Department of Engineering Mechanics, Key Laboratory of Soft Machines and Smart Devices of Zhejiang Province, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027, China
jqian@zju.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

ASME doi:10.1115/1.4037884 History: Received August 17, 2017; Revised September 03, 2017

Abstract

The immobilization of receptor-ligand molecules in dynamic force spectroscopy often relies on an extra noncovalent linkage to solid surfaces, resulting in two barrier-crossing diffusion processes in series and concurrent bond dissociations. One outstanding theoretical issue is whether the linkage between the immobilizer and biomolecule is sufficiently strong during repeated force ramping in the measurements and how it might influence the interpretation on receptor-ligand kinetics. Following the classical framework by Kramers, we regard each dissociation process as a flux of probabilistic bond configuration outward over an energy barrier in the coordinated energy landscape, and solve the two coupled boundary value problems in the form of Smoluchowski equation. Strong kinetic and mechanical coupling is observed between the two molecular bonds in series, with the results showing that involving a noncovalent linkage in dynamic force spectroscopy can obscure the unbinding characteristics of the receptor-ligand bond. Our approach provides a quantitative assessment to the hidden effects of having a fragile molecular anchorage in dynamic force spectroscopy and allows the corrected interpretation on receptor-ligand dissociation kinetics in the case.

Copyright (c) 2017 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In