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Research Papers

Frictional Energy Dissipation in Wavy Surfaces

[+] Author and Article Information
Lejie Liu

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Wisconsin–Madison,
1513 University Avenue,
Madison, WI 53706

Melih Eriten

Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Wisconsin–Madison,
1513 University Avenue,
Madison, WI 53706
e-mail: eriten@wisc.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Applied Mechanics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF APPLIED MECHANICS. Manuscript received June 18, 2016; final manuscript received August 13, 2016; published online September 9, 2016. Assoc. Editor: Shaoxing Qu.

J. Appl. Mech 83(12), 121001 (Sep 09, 2016) (7 pages) Paper No: JAM-16-1305; doi: 10.1115/1.4034461 History: Received June 18, 2016; Revised August 13, 2016

Accurate estimation and tuning of frictional damping are critical for proper design, safety, and reliability of assembled structures. In this study, we investigate how surface geometry and boundary conditions affect frictional energy dissipation under microslip contact situations. In particular, we investigate the frictional losses of a two-dimensional (2D) deformable wavy surface in contact with rigid plate under specific normal and tangential loading. We also propose a dissipation tuning mechanism by tension-induced wrinkling of a composite surface. This surface is made of stiff strips printed on a compliant substrate. We show that the contact geometry of wrinkling surfaces can be altered significantly by tensile loading and design of the composite surface. Using this, we present frictional dissipation maps as functions of applied tension and one of the geometric parameters in the composite design; spacing between stiff strips. Those maps illustrate the dissipation tuning capability of wrinkled surfaces, and thus present a unique mean of damping control.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Abaqus model of 2D wrinkling surface in contact with a rigid plate

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Fig. 2

Shear traction of analytical results and FEM results for (a) Q/fP = 0.2, (b) Q/fP = 0.3, and (c) Q/fP = 0.4

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Fig. 3

Comparison of normalized energy dissipation for a specific case between the integral formulation from Eq. (3) and “Frictional dissipation” parameter in abaqus

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Fig. 4

Normalized energy dissipation versus the corrugation of the sinusoidal surface under constant normal displacement

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Fig. 5

Contour plot of energy dissipation for normal displacement boundary conditions based on varying wavelength and corrugation

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Fig. 6

Normalized energy dissipation versus the corrugation of the sinusoidal surface under constant normal load

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Fig. 7

Contour plot of energy dissipation for normal load boundary conditions based on varying wavelength and corrugation

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Fig. 8

Surface wrinkling model including transfer-printing stiff strips with length L and height t periodically on a long substrate with height h under uniform tensile stress p

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Fig. 9

Contour plot of axial strain within the composite strip–substrate domain of one wavelength shown at the top

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Fig. 10

(a) Comparison of the sinusoidal profile of a FE model that s = 0.5 mm and εa  = 0.08 (red dotted line) and an analytical sinusoidal curve (blue line) which has the same wavelength and corrugation amplitude (in the plane parallel to the uniform tensile stress). (b) Axial strains along with the green dashed line N0 and its corresponding wrinkling model for the same FE model.

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Fig. 11

Corrugation extracted by analytical expression (lines) from Eq. (13) and FEM (circles) for the spacing value, s = 0.05, 0.5, and 1.4 mm

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Fig. 12

Contour plot of energy dissipation for (a) normal displacement boundary condition, and (b) normal load boundary condition based on varying strip spacing and applied strain

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