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Research Papers

Investigation of Pile-Up Behavior for Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Elevated-Temperature Indentation

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhaoliang Qu

State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and
Complex System,
College of Engineering,
Peking University,
Beijing 100871, China

Yongmao Pei

State Key Laboratory for Turbulence
and Complex System,
College of Engineering,
Peking University,
Beijing 100871, China;
State Key Laboratory for Strength
and Vibration of Mechanical Structures,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an 710049, China
e-mail: peiym@pku.edu.cn

Rujie He

Institute of Advanced Structure Technology,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China
e-mail: herujie@pku.edu.cn

Daining Fang

State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System,
College of Engineering,
Peking University,
Beijing 100871, China;
Institute of Advanced Structure Technology,
Beijing Institute of Technology,
Beijing 100081, China

1Corresponding authors.

Contributed by the Applied Mechanics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF APPLIED MECHANICS. Manuscript received December 11, 2015; final manuscript received January 3, 2016; published online January 27, 2016. Editor: Yonggang Huang.

J. Appl. Mech 83(4), 041009 (Jan 27, 2016) (6 pages) Paper No: JAM-15-1666; doi: 10.1115/1.4032467 History: Received December 11, 2015; Revised January 03, 2016

The elevated-temperature indentation has been utilized to measure the elevated-temperature mechanical properties of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), which have a major influence on their thermomechanical characteristics and failures. In this paper, the pile-up phenomenon of TBCs under elevated-temperature indentation was investigated, and a characterization method for Young's modulus of TBCs was proposed. According to the dimensional analysis and finite-element method, a critical temperature-dependent factor was conducted as the criterion for pile-up behavior. Some experiment results agreed fairly well with the criterion. Then, the pile-up behavior of TBCs at elevated temperature was studied. It was found that the pile-up behavior depended on the temperature-dependent factor and got larger with increasing temperature. Finally, a characterization method was proposed to extract the Young's modulus of TBCs, which was found to be more suitable for elevated-temperature indentation.

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Figures

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Fig. 3

The relationship between the real contact depth and Pmax/(Shmax) by varying the yield stress. The inset shows the influence of the yield stress on Pmax/(Shmax).

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Fig. 4

The relationship between the real contact depth and Pmax/(Shmax) by varying the Young's modulus. The inset shows the influence of the Young's modulus on Pmax/(Shmax).

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Fig. 5

The influence of maximum indentation depth on the dimensionless numbers.

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Fig. 6

The elastic–plastic dependent height at different temperature-dependent factors (Q(T)). Region Ι shows pile-up, and region ΙΙ denotes sink-in. The point W denotes the critical point between regions Ι and ΙΙ.

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Fig. 7

The temperature-dependent factors and elastic–plastic dependent height for NiAlPt and YSZ at different temperatures. The dashed–dotted lines denote the criteria for pile-up behavior and elastic–plastic dependent height. Tre-NiAlPt denotes the recrystallization temperature of NiAlPt.

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Fig. 8

The Young's moduli of NiAlPt and YSZ obtained both from the characterization method considering pile-up behavior and the Oliver–Pharr method. E0(T) is the value of the input Young's modulus in FEM.

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Fig. 2

The modified contact profile under elevated-temperature indentation

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Fig. 1

The load–displacement curve under elevated-temperature indentation

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