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Research Papers

An Anisotropic Multiphysics Model for Intervertebral Disk

[+] Author and Article Information
Xin Gao

Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Miami,
Coral Gables, FL 33146
e-mail: x.gao3@umiami.edu

Qiaoqiao Zhu

Department of Biomedical Engineering,
University of Miami,
Coral Gables, FL 33146
e-mail: q.zhu3@umiami.edu

Weiyong Gu

Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical and
Aerospace Engineering,
University of Miami,
Coral Gables, FL 33146;
Department of Biomedical Engineering,
University of Miami,
Coral Gables, FL 33146
e-mail: wgu@miami.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Applied Mechanics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF APPLIED MECHANICS. Manuscript received September 1, 2015; final manuscript received October 12, 2015; published online November 9, 2015. Editor: Yonggang Huang.

J. Appl. Mech 83(2), 021011 (Nov 09, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: JAM-15-1461; doi: 10.1115/1.4031793 History: Received September 01, 2015; Revised October 12, 2015

Intervertebral disk (IVD) is the largest avascular structure in human body, consisting of three types of charged hydrated soft tissues. Its mechanical behavior is nonlinear and anisotropic, due mainly to nonlinear interactions among different constituents within tissues. In this study, a more realistic anisotropic multiphysics model was developed based on the continuum mixture theory and employed to characterize the couplings of multiple physical fields in the IVD. Numerical simulations demonstrate that this model is capable of systematically predicting the mechanical and electrochemical signals within the disk under various loading conditions, which is essential in understanding the mechanobiology of IVD.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 2

Schematic diagrams for experimental protocols used in simulations in this study. (a) Creep test, (b) bending and torsion tests, (c) osmotical loading test, and (d) dynamic loading test.

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Fig. 3

Simulated disk height loss during creep test, and compared with experimental results [52]

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Fig. 1

A schematic of the IVD showing the AF, NP, and CEPs. The dimensions are in millimeter.

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Fig. 4

Fluid pressure during creep test. (a) Before load applied, (b) right after load applied, (c) after 2 hrs of creep, and (d) after 4 hrs of creep.

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Fig. 5

Simulated range of motion of disk under (a) 2.5 N·m and (b) 5.0 N·m bending momentums, and compared with experimental results (minimum, median, and maximum) [54]

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Fig. 6

Distributions of fiber stretch under 5.0 N·m bending momentum in (a) flexion, (b) extension, (c) lateral bending, and (d) axial rotation. Only one family of fibers are shown.

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Fig. 7

Simulated mechanical response of disk to the change of bath saline solution, from 0.15 M to 1.50 M, and compared with experimental results (mean ± SD) [57]

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Fig. 8

Simulated distribution of electrical potential under dynamical loading at midsagittal line, and compared with experimental results (mean ± SEM) [59]

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