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Research Papers

Viscoplastic Modeling of the Green Anode Paste Compaction Process

[+] Author and Article Information
H. Chaouki

NSERC/Alcoa Industrial Research Chair MACE3 and
Aluminium Research Centre-REGAL,
Laval University,
1065 Avenue de la Medecine,
Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada;
Department of Civil and Water Engineering,
Laval University,
1065 Avenue de la Medecine,
Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
e-mail: hicham.chaouki@gci.ulaval.ca

D. Picard

NSERC/Alcoa Industrial Research Chair MACE3 and
Aluminium Research Centre-REGAL,
Laval University,
1065 Avenue de la Medecine,
Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada;
Department of Civil and Water Engineering,
Laval University,
1065 Avenue de la Medecine,
Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
e-mail: donald.picard@gci.ulaval.ca

D. Ziegler

Alcoa Smelting Center of Excellence,
Program Manager Modeling,
100 Technical Drive,
Alcoa Technical Center, PA 15069
e-mail: Donald.Ziegler@alcoa.com

K. Azari

NSERC/Alcoa Industrial Research Chair MACE3 and
Aluminium Research Centre-REGAL,
Laval University,
1065 Avenue de la Medecine,
Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada;
Department of Mining, Metallurgical and
Materials Engineering,
Laval University,
1065 Avenue de la Medecine,
Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
e-mail: kamran.azari-dorcheh.1@ulaval.ca

H. Alamdari

NSERC/Alcoa Industrial Research Chair MACE3 and
Aluminium Research Centre-REGAL,
Laval University,
1065 Avenue de la Medecine,
Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada;
Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering,
Laval University,
1065 Avenue de la Medecine,
Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
e-mail: Houshang.Alamdari@gmn.ulaval.ca

M. Fafard

NSERC/Alcoa Industrial Research Chair MACE3 and
Aluminium Research Centre-REGAL,
Laval University,
1065 Avenue de la Medecine,
Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada;
Department of Civil and Water Engineering,
Laval University,
1065 Avenue de la Medecine,
Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
e-mail: mario.fafard@gci.ulaval.ca

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Applied Mechanics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF APPLIED MECHANICS. Manuscript received August 13, 2015; final manuscript received October 19, 2015; published online November 11, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Thomas Siegmund.

J. Appl. Mech 83(2), 021002 (Nov 11, 2015) (10 pages) Paper No: JAM-15-1428; doi: 10.1115/1.4031857 History: Received August 13, 2015; Revised October 19, 2015

The aim of this work is to simulate the forming process of green anodes. For this purpose, a nonlinear compressible viscoplastic constitutive law is presented. The concept of natural reference configuration is considered. Within an isothermal thermodynamic framework, a Helmholtz free energy is proposed to take into account the nonlinear compressible deformation process occurring between natural reference configuration and current configuration. A dissipation potential is introduced in order to characterize the irreversible aspect of compaction process. The constitutive law is thus formulated through two equations: (1) an expression of Cauchy stress tensor and (2) a differential equation characterizing the evolution of the natural reference configuration. Material parameters are assumed to be a function of the apparent green density. An experimental study is carried out in order to characterize the compaction behavior of the anode paste. A user's material VUMAT subroutine for finite-element dynamic explicit analysis has been developed and implemented in the abaqus commercial software. To evaluate the model predictive capability, numerical simulations of the compaction forming process of anode paste were performed. Simulation results show that the constitutive law predicts the experimental trends and gives insight of physical responses. This constitutes a first step toward characterizing the anode paste behavior and making a benchmark with experimental results on the forming process of anode paste.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Natural configuration and deformation gradient tensor decomposition

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Fig. 2

Pressure versus height ratio

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Fig. 3

Apparent density versus pressure

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Fig. 4

Cylindrical mould equipped with a pin

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Fig. 5

Anode paste after compaction

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Fig. 6

CT scan results for the compacted anode paste (mix A at 130 °C) ((a) h = 16 mm, (b) h = 32 mm, and (c) h = 70 mm)

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Fig. 7

CT scan result: meridian plane of the compacted sample (mix A at 130 °C)

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Fig. 8

Inverse identification results: pressure versus height ratio

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Fig. 9

Inverse identification results: apparent density versus pressure

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Fig. 10

The effect of parameters α and β on the radial pressure evolution

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Fig. 11

The effect of parameters α and β on the axial pressure evolution

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Fig. 12

Density distribution through the meridian plane of the sample obtained using mix A

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Fig. 13

Density variation along the radius: finite-element analysis versus experiment (mix A, h = 20 mm)

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Fig. 14

Density variation along the radius: finite-element analysis versus experiment (mix A, h = 30 mm)

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Fig. 15

Density variation along the radius: finite-element analysis versus experiment (mix A, h = 70 mm)

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Fig. 16

Density distribution through the meridian plane of the sample obtained using mix B

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Fig. 17

Density variation along the radius: finite-element analysis versus experiment (mix B, h = 20 mm)

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Fig. 18

Density variation along the radius: finite-element analysis versus experiment (mix B, h = 30 mm)

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Fig. 19

Density variation along the radius: finite-element analysis versus experiment (mix B, h = 70 mm)

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Fig. 20

The effect of the material function λ(.) on the density profile of the mix B for upper layers (h = 70 mm)

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