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Research Papers

A Deformation Mechanism for Ridge-Shaped Kink Structure in Layered Solids

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiao-Wen Lei

Assistant Professor
Department of Adaptive Machine Systems,
Osaka University,
2-1 Yamadaoka,
Suita 565-0871, Osaka, Japan
e-mail: leixiaowen@ams.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

Akihiro Nakatani

Professor
Mem. ASME
Department of Adaptive Machine Systems,
Osaka University,
2-1 Yamadaoka,
Suita 565-0871, Osaka, Japan
e-mail: nakatani@ams.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Applied Mechanics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF APPLIED MECHANICS. Manuscript received January 2, 2015; final manuscript received February 23, 2015; published online June 3, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Vikram Deshpande.

J. Appl. Mech 82(7), 071016 (Jul 01, 2015) (6 pages) Paper No: JAM-15-1003; doi: 10.1115/1.4030328 History: Received January 02, 2015; Revised February 23, 2015; Online June 03, 2015

A deformation mechanism for ridge-shaped kink structure (RSKS), a type of localized deformation, is studied with a discussion focusing on the kink deformation of a monocrystal with a single-slip system under a plane-strain condition. From a geometrical study of displacement continuity it is found that, to satisfy displacement continuity, the kink boundary formed by the deformation from an initially homogeneous structure must have symmetry. We propose a simple model of the RSKS deformation mode to accomplish plastic deformation from a compressive force parallel to the slip direction. First, important geometrical knowledge related to the RSKS formation mechanism is formulated analytically. Then, a simulation of a spring–mass model is performed to clarify the RSKS formation mechanism. The intensity of the angle-dependent force field is found to affect the deformation mode.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of RSKS formed in a layered solid subjected to compressive force parallel to the basal slip direction

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Fig. 2

Geometry of the kink boundary between two domains (1) and (2) formed by shear deformation

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Fig. 3

A simple model of RSKS under uniaxial compressive loading

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Fig. 4

Spring–mass model used for computational simulations of uniaxial compression tests

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Fig. 5

Plot of the shear strain outside the kink domain versus that inside the kink domain

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Fig. 6

Plot of the shear strain inside the kink domain versus that outside the kink domain

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Fig. 7

Plots of the rotation inside the kink domain and the tilt angle of the kink boundary versus the shear strain outside the kink domain

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Fig. 8

Plots of the Schmid factor inside the kink domain and the tilt angle of the kink boundary versus the shear strain outside the kink domain

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Fig. 9

Snapshot of the particle configuration and rotation of the computational simulation using the spring–mass model (case 1)

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Fig. 10

Snapshot of the particle configuration and rotation of the computational simulation using the spring–mass model (case 2)

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Fig. 11

Snapshot of the particle configuration and rotation of the computational simulation using the spring–mass model (case 3)

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