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Research Papers

Cohesive-Shear-Lag Modeling of Interfacial Stress Transfer Between a Monolayer Graphene and a Polymer Substrate

[+] Author and Article Information
Guodong Guo

Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
North Carolina State University,
Raleigh, NC 27695

Yong Zhu

Department of Mechanical
and Aerospace Engineering,
North Carolina State University,
Raleigh, NC 27695
e-mail: yong_zhu@ncsu.edu

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Applied Mechanics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF APPLIED MECHANICS. Manuscript received November 20, 2014; final manuscript received January 19, 2015; published online January 30, 2015. Editor: Yonggang Huang.

J. Appl. Mech 82(3), 031005 (Mar 01, 2015) (7 pages) Paper No: JAM-14-1530; doi: 10.1115/1.4029635 History: Received November 20, 2014; Revised January 19, 2015; Online January 30, 2015

Interfacial shear stress transfer of a monolayer graphene on top of a polymer substrate subjected to uniaxial tension was investigated by a cohesive zone model integrated with a shear-lag model. Strain distribution in the graphene flake was found to behave in three stages in general, bonded, damaged, and debonded, as a result of the interfacial stress transfer. By fitting the cohesive-shear-lag model to our experimental results, the interface properties were identified including interface stiffness (74 Tpa/m), shear strength (0.50 Mpa), and mode II fracture toughness (0.08 N/m). Parametric studies showed that larger interface stiffness and/or shear strength can lead to better stress transfer efficiency, and high fracture toughness can delay debonding from occurring. 3D finite element simulations were performed to capture the interfacial stress transfer in graphene flakes with realistic geometries. The present study can provide valuable insight and design guidelines for enhancing interfacial shear stress transfer in nanocomposites, stretchable electronics and other applications based on graphene and other 2D nanomaterials.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Bilinear cohesive law

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Fig. 2

Schematic diagram of the monolayer graphene/PET configuration under uniaxial tension

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Fig. 3

Strain distribution along the length of a graphene flake. Symbols represent experimental data, solid lines are the analytical solution of the cohesive-shear-lag model and dashed lines are the FEA simulation. Red line (0.2% strain) indicates that the interface is perfectly bonded while blank lines indicate that damage occurs.

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Fig. 4

Effect of interface stiffness. Red lines indicate that the interface is perfectly bonded while blank lines indicate that damage occurs. When K0 = 740 Tpa/m, the first critical strain ɛc1 = 0.10%; when K0 = 7.4 Tpa/m, ɛc1 = 1.07%.

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Fig. 5

Effect of interfacial shear strength. Red lines indicate that the interface is perfectly bonded while blank lines indicate damage occurs. When τmax = 0.4Mpa, ɛc1 = 0.25%; and when τmax = 0.6Mpa, ɛc1 = 0.37%.

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Fig. 6

Effect of graphene length and interface fracture toughness on the second critical strain defined in Sec. 2.3

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Fig. 7

Strain distribution in a graphene flake with length of 60 μm using the cohesive-shear-lag model and the nonlinear shear-lag model

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Normal strain distribution in (a) rectangular, (b) H shaped, and (c) triangular graphene flakes under different applied substrate strain levels (in x direction). Graphene length is 21.8 μm and width is 5 μm in all cases. A quarter of the model is used for the rectangular and H shapes, and a half for the triangular shape due to symmetry.

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