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Research Papers

Lattice Structures Made From Surface-Modified Steel Sheets

[+] Author and Article Information
Son Phu Mai

Institute of Mechanics,
264 Doi Can,
Ha Noi, Vietnam;
Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology,
18 Hoang Quoc Viet,
Ha Noi, Vietnam
e-mail: phuson78@yahoo.com

Chun Sheng Wen

Department of Mechanical and
Biomedical Engineering,
City University of Hong Kong,
Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
e-mail: chunswen@cityu.edu.hk

Jian Lu

Department of Mechanical and
Biomedical Engineering,
City University of Hong Kong,
Kowloon, Hong Kong, China
e-mail: jianlu@cityu.edu.hk

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Applied Mechanics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF APPLIED MECHANICS. Manuscript received August 19, 2014; final manuscript received November 7, 2014; accepted manuscript posted November 17, 2014; published online December 3, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Daining Fang.

J. Appl. Mech 82(1), 011007 (Jan 01, 2015) (11 pages) Paper No: JAM-14-1379; doi: 10.1115/1.4029089 History: Received August 19, 2014; Revised November 07, 2014; Accepted November 17, 2014; Online December 03, 2014

Nanostructured materials produced by surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) method are explored for two periodic lattice topologies: square and Kagome. Selected SMAT strategies are applied to bar members in the unit cell of each topology considered. The maximum axial stress in these bars is calculated as a function of the macroscopic in-plane principal stresses. A simple yield criterion is used to determine the elastic limit of the lattice with each SMAT strategy, and the relative merits of the competing strategies are discussed in terms of the reinforced yield strength and the SMAT efficiency. Experiments of selected SMAT strategies on both square and Kagome lattices made from stainless steel sheets are performed to assess the analytical predictions for the loading case of uniaxial tension.

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References

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Two-dimensional periodic lattices: (a) hexagonal, (b) triangulated, (c) square, and (d) Kagome

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Fig. 2

The true stress versus logarithm strain of the parent material with and without SMAT treatment

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Fig. 3

SMAT for each unit cell of the square lattice: (a) strategy I, (b) strategy II, and (c) strategy III

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Fig. 4

(a) Internal force components at the two ends of each bar member; (b) SMAT strategy III applied to the bar, and the moment diagram distribution

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Fig. 5

Yield loci of the square lattice with SMAT strategies N to III in the case of (a) θ = 0, and (b) θ = π/4

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Fig. 7

Yield loci of the Kagome lattice with SMAT strategies N to III in the case of (a) θ = 0,ρ¯ = 0.3, and (b) θ = π/6,ρ¯ = 0.3

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Fig. 8

Geometry of the experimental specimens: (a) 0/90deg square, (b) ±45deg square lattices. Dimensions are in mm.

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Fig. 9

The 0/90deg square lattice with (a) fully SMAT—strategy I, and (b) partly SMAT—strategy II. The ±45deg square lattice with (c) fully SMAT—strategy I, and (d) partly SMAT—strategy III. Dimensions are in mm.

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Fig. 10

Measured responses of (a) 0/90deg square and (b) ±45deg square lattices

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Fig. 11

Fractured 0/90deg square lattice specimens: (a) no SMAT—strategy N, (b) partly SMAT—strategy II, and (c) fully SMAT—strategy I. Deformed ±45deg square lattice specimens: (d) no SMAT—strategy N, (e) partly SMAT—strategy III, and (f) fully SMAT—strategy I (black arrows indicate the fracture positions).

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Fig. 12

Geometries of (a) horizontal Kagome and (b) vertical Kagome lattice specimens. Dimensions are in mm.

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Fig. 13

Horizontal Kagome lattice with (a) fully SMAT—strategy I, and (b) partly SMAT—strategy II. Vertical Kagome lattice with (c) fully SMAT—strategy I, and (d) partly SMAT—strategy III. Dimensions are in mm.

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Fig. 14

Measured responses of (a) horizontal Kagome lattice and (b) vertical Kagome lattice specimens

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Fig. 15

Fractured horizontal Kagome lattice specimens: (a) no SMAT—strategy N, (b) partly SMAT—strategy II, and (c) fully SMAT—strategy I. Fractured vertical Kagome lattice specimens: (d) no SMAT—strategy N, (e) partly SMAT—strategy III, and (f) fully SMAT—strategy I (black arrows indicate the fracture positions).

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Fig. 16

Uniaxial tension of ±45deg square lattice: (a) initial bending-dominated regime, (b) bending of a half of the beam element, and (c) stretching-dominated regime

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