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Research Papers

Dynamic Crushing of All-Metallic Corrugated Panels Filled With Close-Celled Aluminum Foams

[+] Author and Article Information
B. Yu

State Key Laboratory for Strength
and Vibration of Mechanical Structures,
School of Aerospace,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an Shaanxi 710049, P. R. China
e-mail: jo_elnino1987@163.com

B. Han

State Key Laboratory for Strength
and Vibration of Mechanical Structures,
School of Aerospace,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an Shaanxi 710049, P. R. China
e-mail: hanbinabc@stu.xjtu.edu.cn

C. Y. Ni

State Key Laboratory for Strength
and Vibration of Mechanical Structures,
School of Aerospace,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an Shaanxi 710049, P. R. China
e-mail: ncygz@126.com

Q. C. Zhang

State Key Laboratory for Strength
and Vibration of Mechanical Structures,
School of Aerospace,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an Shaanxi 710049, P. R. China
e-mail: zqc111999@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

C. Q. Chen

Department of Engineering Mechanics,
AML and CNMM,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, P. R. China
e-mail: chencq@tsinghua.edu.cn

T. J. Lu

State Key Laboratory for Strength
and Vibration of Mechanical Structures,
School of Aerospace,
Xi'an Jiaotong University,
Xi'an Shaanxi 710049, P. R. China
e-mail: tjlu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Applied Mechanics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF APPLIED MECHANICS. Manuscript received April 2, 2014; final manuscript received July 21, 2014; accepted manuscript posted November 6, 2014; published online November 21, 2014. Editor: Yonggang Huang.

J. Appl. Mech 82(1), 011006 (Jan 01, 2015) (8 pages) Paper No: JAM-14-1152; doi: 10.1115/1.4028995 History: Received April 02, 2014; Revised July 21, 2014; Accepted November 06, 2014; Online November 21, 2014

Under quasi-static uniaxial compression, inserting aluminum foams into the interstices of a metallic sandwich panel with corrugated core increased significantly both its peak crushing strength and energy absorption per unit mass. This beneficial effect diminished however if the foam relative density was relatively low or the compression velocity became sufficiently high. To provide insight into the varying role of aluminum foam filler with increasing compression velocity, the crushing response and collapse modes of all metallic corrugate-cored sandwich panels filled with close-celled aluminum foams were studied using the method of finite elements (FEs). The constraint that sandwich panels with and without foam filling had the same total weight was enforced. The effects of plastic hardening and strain rate sensitivity of the strut material as well as foam/strut interfacial debonding were quantified. Three collapse modes (quasi-static, transition, and shock modes) were identified, corresponding to different ranges of compression velocity. Strengthening due to foam insertion and inertial stabilization both acted to provide support for the struts against buckling. At relatively low compression velocities, the struts were mainly strengthened by the surrounding foam; at high compression velocities, inertia stabilization played a more dominant role than foam filling.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Typical quasi-static compressive responses of empty corrugated panel, aluminum foam alone, and aluminum foam-filled corrugated panel

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Fig. 2

(a) As-fabricated empty and foam-filled sandwich specimens and the interface between foam fillers and core web showing good bonding condition with epoxy glue and (b) specification of idealized FE model

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Fig. 3

Normalized reaction force on front and back faces and deformation patterns of foam-filled corrugated panel in terms of nominal compressive strain, L/a = 20 and ρ¯f = 0.19: (a) V¯ = 0.0083, (b) V¯ = 0.33, and (c) V¯ = 1

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Fig. 4

Influence of foam relative density upon front face reaction force and strut deflection profile (L/a = 20): (a) V¯ = 0.0083, (b) V¯ = 0.33, and (c) V¯ = 1

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Fig. 5

Schematic representation of foam-filled corrugated core in shock regime. Dotted line denotes the initial configuration while solid line denotes the deformed one.

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Fig. 6

NARF on face sheets of foam-filled corrugated panel plotted as a function of normalized compression velocity: (a) L/a = 20 and ρ¯f = 0.19 and (b) L/a = 20 and ρ¯f = 0.09

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Fig. 7

Dependency of strut aspect ratio upon foam relative density

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Fig. 8

Influence of foam relative density upon front face reaction force and strut deflection profile of foam-filled panel (M¯ = 0.05): (a) V¯ = 0.0083, (b) V¯ = 0.33, and (c) V¯ = 1

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Fig. 9

Influence of strain hardening and strain rate sensitivity of strut material on NARFs for selected compression velocities, with L/a = 40 and ρ¯f = 0.13

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Fig. 10

Dependency of dynamic enhance ratio on foam relative density at selected compression velocities: (a) nonhardening and rate insensitive strut, L/a = 40, total mass not constrained and (b) nonhardening and rate insensitive strut, total mass constrained, M¯ = 0.05

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