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Research Papers

Analytic Models of a Thin Glass–Polymer Laminate and Development of a Rational Engineering Design Methodology

[+] Author and Article Information
Yuki Shitanoki

Faculty of Science and Technology,
Keio University,
3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku,
Yokohama 233-8522, Japan
New Business Development Japan,
DuPont Kabushiki Kaisha,
DuPont Japan Technology Center,
19-2 Kiyohara Kogyo Danchi,
Utsunomiya 321-3231, Japan;
e-mail: Yuki.Shitanoki@dupont.com

Stephen J. Bennison

Glass Laminating Solutions &
Vinyls, Kuraray America, Inc.,
Experimental Station,
200 Powder Mill Road,
Wilmington, DE 19803
e-mail: Stephen.Bennison@kuraray.com

Yasuhiro Koike

Faculty of Science and Technology,
Keio University,
3-14-1 Hiyoshi,
Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 233-8522, Japan
e-mail: koike@appi.keio.ac.jp

Contributed by the Applied Mechanics of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF APPLIED MECHANICS. Manuscript received August 3, 2014; final manuscript received October 19, 2014; accepted manuscript posted October 24, 2014; published online November 10, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Chad M. Landis.

J. Appl. Mech 81(12), 121009 (Dec 01, 2014) (7 pages) Paper No: JAM-14-1349; doi: 10.1115/1.4028902 History: Received August 03, 2014; Revised October 19, 2014; Accepted October 24, 2014; Online November 10, 2014

Analytic models that describe the mechanical behavior of thin glass–polymer laminate structures have been investigated experimentally and via finite-element analysis (FEA). Standard laminate effective thickness models were shown to be applicable to a wide range of glass/interlayer thickness ratios and to a wide range of interlayer shear moduli, covering most currently existing glass laminates. In addition, an analytic comparison of the effective thickness model with the traditional composite beam model clarified the applicable limits of the former model in the range of the interlayer/glass thickness ratio and interlayer shear modulus. These modeling approaches enable a rational engineering design approach for structurally efficient, lightweight, and safe glazing laminates.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

The schematic representation of the four point bend test. Stress and deflection are measured at the center of the bottom side of the lower glass ply.

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Fig. 2

Error between the Wölfel and the EET for each laminate glass structure. t x/t y (D or S) denotes “x mm glass/y mm interlayer/x mm glass,” error rate for effective thickness for deflection or stress. (a) Configuration for the FEA: L1 = 180, L2 = 40, L3 = 70, b = 38.1, and (b) configuration for experiment: L1 = 200, L2 = 100, L3 = 50, b = 100.

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Fig. 3

Comparison of experimental results and the theoretical effective thickness. (a) Effective thickness for deflection, (b) effective thickness for stress. Calculated shear transfer coefficient and effective thickness assuming shear coefficient = 1 is also plotted for comparison.

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Fig. 4

Finite-element model for four point bend test. The half-length of the laminate plate was replicated and x-symmetry was used. u3 was fixed at 0 as a boundary condition along the supporting bar in the real experiment. Load was applied as uniform pressure to a rubber strip (3 mm × 38.1 mm × t1 mm) attached to the upper glass ply.

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Fig. 5

Effective thickness for (a) deflection and (b) stress in 5 mm glass/1 mm interlayer/5 mm glass laminate as a function of interlayer shear modulus

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Fig. 6

Effective thickness for (a) deflection and (b) stress in 1 mm glass/1 mm interlayer/1 mm glass laminate as a function of interlayer shear modulus

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Fig. 7

Effective thickness for (a) deflection and (b) stress in 1 mm glass/5 mm interlayer/1 mm glass laminate as a function of interlayer shear modulus

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Fig. 8

Effective thickness for (a) deflection and (b) stress in 1 μm glass/1 mm interlayer/1 μm glass laminate as a function of interlayer shear modulus

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Fig. 9

Cross-sectional maximum principal stress plot of 1 mm glass/1 mm interlayer/1 mm glass. The four point bend test model has been used and the cross section at the center of the beam is shown.

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