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Technical Brief

Crack Branching Characteristics at Different Propagation Speeds: From Quasi-Static to Supersonic Regime

[+] Author and Article Information
Y. J. Jia

AML, CNMM,
Department of Engineering Mechanics,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China;
Process and Layout Design Division,
China Nuclear Power Engineering Co. Ltd.,
Beijing 100840, China

B. Liu

AML, CNMM,
Department of Engineering Mechanics,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China
e-mail: liubin@tsinghua.edu.cn

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Applied Mechanics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF APPLIED MECHANICS. Manuscript received September 2, 2014; final manuscript received October 13, 2014; accepted manuscript posted October 16, 2014; published online October 27, 2014. Editor: Yonggang Huang.

J. Appl. Mech 81(12), 124501 (Oct 27, 2014) (4 pages) Paper No: JAM-14-1411; doi: 10.1115/1.4028811 History: Received September 02, 2014; Revised October 13, 2014; Accepted October 16, 2014

Classical dynamic fracture mechanics predicts that the crack branching occurs when crack propagation speed exceeds a subsonic critical velocity. In this paper, we performed simulations on the dynamic fracture behaviors of idealized discrete mass–spring systems. It is interesting to note that a crack does not branch when traveling at supersonic speed, which is consistent with others' experimental observations. The mechanism for the characteristics of crack branching at different propagation speeds is studied by numerical and theoretical analysis. It is found that for all different speed regimes, the maximum circumferential stress near the crack tip determines the crack branching behaviors.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

The distributions of circumferential stress component near the crack tip at different crack propagation speed: (a) quasi-static crack propagation, (b) subsonic dynamic crack propagation, and (c) supersonic crack propagation

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

The different results of crack branching at different propagation speeds: (a) supersonic crack propagation, (b) subsonic dynamic crack propagation, and (c) quasi-static crack propagation. The figures in the left column show the stress contours, and the figures in the right column show the crack propagation path.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

(a) The numerical model of a 2D strip specimen with triangle lattice and (b) the critical force-stretch curve of each connecting bond

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

(a) The experimental result of crack branching in subsonic dynamic crack propagation [21] and (b) the experimental result that crack propagates along a straight line at supersonic speed [23]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

(a) The numerical model of a 2D strip specimen under tilted tensile displacement loading and (b) the crack does not branch in stage of supersonic speed at first and then branches when propagation speed is lower than supersonic speed. The figures in the above row show the stress contours, and the figures in the below row show the crack propagation path.

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