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Research Papers

The Temperature-Dependent Strength of Metals: Theory and Experimental Validation

[+] Author and Article Information
Honghong Su

Department of Engineering Mechanics,
Chongqing University,
Chongqing 400044, China;
AML, Department of Engineering Mechanics,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China

Xufei Fang

AML, Department of Engineering Mechanics,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China;
Center for Mechanics and Materials,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China

Xue Feng

AML, Department of Engineering Mechanics,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China;
Center for Mechanics and Materials,
Tsinghua University,
Beijing 100084, China
e-mail: fengxue@tsinghua.edu.cn

Bo Yan

Department of Engineering Mechanics,
Chongqing University,
Chongqing 400044, China

1Corresponding author.

Contributed by the Applied Mechanics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNAL OF APPLIED MECHANICS. Manuscript received May 12, 2014; final manuscript received June 3, 2014; accepted manuscript posted June 6, 2014; published online June 19, 2014. Editor: Yonggang Huang.

J. Appl. Mech 81(9), 091003 (Jun 19, 2014) (6 pages) Paper No: JAM-14-1205; doi: 10.1115/1.4027814 History: Received May 12, 2014; Revised June 03, 2014; Accepted June 06, 2014

In this work, we propose a strength theory as a function of temperature and state of stresses for metals. Based on the fracture in the hydrostatic stress, we derived a generalized strength model, in which the fracture strength decreases almost linearly with the increasing of the temperature. Furthermore this generalized strength model was extended to the general state of stresses by replacing the equivalent hydrostatic stresses with the temperature effect based on the general thermodynamics principles. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was also conducted to simulate the fracture evolution at high temperature and to explain the mechanism of temperature-dependent strength at atomic scale. The proposed model was also verified by experiment of Mo-10Cu alloy at elevated temperature.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Theoretical prediction of temperature-dependent strength under hydrostatic stress state

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Fig. 2

Uni-axial tensile stress–strain curves of Mo (MD simulation)

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Fig. 3

Temperature dependent tensile strength of Mo (MD simulation)

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Fig. 4

Strength curves of Mo for plane stress states at different temperatures (MD simulation)

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Fig. 5

Temperature-dependent fracture strength of Mo-10Cu

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Fig. 6

Micromorphologies of Mo-10Cu fracture surface at different temperatures

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