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Technical Briefs

A Compact and Easily Accepted Continuous Model for the Elastic-Plastic Contact of a Sphere and a Flat

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhi Qian Wang

State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics,
Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology,
Chinese Academy of Sciences,
Shanghai 200050, People's Republic of China
e-mail: wangzhiqian@mail.sim.ac.cn

Contributed by the Applied Mechanics Division of ASME for publication in the JOURNALOF APPLIED MECHANICS. Manuscript received April 5, 2012; final manuscript received July 6, 2012; accepted manuscript posted July 25, 2012; published online November 19, 2012. Assoc. Editor: Nick Aravas.

J. Appl. Mech 80(1), 014506 (Nov 19, 2012) (3 pages) Paper No: JAM-12-1139; doi: 10.1115/1.4007230 History: Received April 05, 2012; Accepted July 06, 2012; Revised July 06, 2012

This paper presents a compact and easily accepted continuous model for the elastic-plastic contact of a sphere and a flat, including the relationships of load and contact area versus displacement and the relationship between the residual plastic displacement and the total displacement. The relationships of load and contact area versus displacement hold in the elastic and elastic-plastic regime. The relationship between the total displacement and the residual plastic displacement, that is the total displacement to the power of 1/2 is linear with the residual plastic displacement to the power of 1/2, has a compact and easily accepted form.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Schematic of the elastic-plastic deformation regime

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Fig. 2

Relationship between F/Fc and δ/δc. The dots are the data computed from Eq. (9), and the solid line is described by Eq. (20).

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Fig. 3

Relationship between A/Ac and δ/δc. The dots are the data computed from Eq. (10), and the solid line is described by Eq. (21).

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Fig. 4

Relationship between (δ/δc)1/2 and (δp/δc)1/2. The dots are the data computed from Eq. (19), and the solid line is described by Eq. (23).

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