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Research Papers

Solution of the Contact Problem of a Rigid Conical Frustum Indenting a Transversely Isotropic Elastic Half-Space

[+] Author and Article Information
X.-L. Gao

Professor
Fellow ASME
Department of Mechanical Engineering,
University of Texas at Dallas,
800 West Campbell Road,
Richardson, TX 75080-3021
e-mail: Xin-Lin.Gao@utdallas.edu

C. L. Mao

Doctoral Student
Department of Architecture,
Texas A&M University,
College Station, TX 77843

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received May 29, 2013; final manuscript received July 14, 2013; accepted manuscript posted July 29, 2013; published online September 23, 2013. Editor: Yonggang Huang.

J. Appl. Mech 81(4), 041007 (Sep 23, 2013) (12 pages) Paper No: JAM-13-1219; doi: 10.1115/1.4025140 History: Received May 29, 2013; Revised July 14, 2013; Accepted July 29, 2013

The contact problem of a rigid conical frustum indenting a transversely isotropic elastic half-space is analytically solved using a displacement method and a stress method, respectively. The displacement method makes use of two potential functions, while the stress method employs one potential function. In both the methods, Hankel's transforms are applied to construct potential functions, and the associated dual integral equations of Titchmarsh's type are analytically solved. The solution obtained using each method gives analytical expressions of the stress and displacement components on the surface of the half-space. These two sets of expressions are seen to be equivalent, thereby confirming the uniqueness of the elasticity solution. The newly derived solution is reduced to the closed-form solution for the contact problem of a conical punch indenting a transversely isotropic elastic half-space. In addition, the closed-form solution for the problem of a flat-end cylindrical indenter punching a transversely isotropic elastic half-space is obtained as a special case. To illustrate the new solution, numerical results are provided for different half-space materials and punch parameters and are compared to those based on the two specific solutions for the conical and cylindrical indentation problems. It is found that the indentation deformation increases with the decrease of the cone angle of the frustum indenter. Moreover, the largest deformation in the half-space is seen to be induced by a conical indenter, followed by a cylindrical indenter and then by a frustum indenter. In addition, the axial force–indentation depth relation is shown to be linear for the frustum indentation, which is similar to that exhibited by both the conical and cylindrical indentations—two limiting cases of the former.

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Figures

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Fig. 1

Contact of a conical frustum punch with a transversely isotropic elastic half-space

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Fig. 2

Axial force acting on the punch varying with α (with a/ab = 1.2) for the three different half-space materials

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Fig. 3

Axial force acting on the punch varying with a/ab (with α = 15 deg) for the three different half-space materials

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Fig. 4

Axial force-indentation depth relations for the CAS–SiC half-space indented by a frustum punch (with a/ab = 1.2), a conical punch and a cylindrical punch

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Fig. 5

Axial force-indentation depth relations for the graphite-epoxy half-space indented by a frustum punch (with a/ab = 1.2), a conical punch and a cylindrical punch

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Fig. 6

Axial force-indentation depth relations for the E-glass half-space indented by a frustum punch (with a/ab = 1.2), a conical punch and a cylindrical punch

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