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Research Papers

Stress Distribution in a Bilayer Elastic Model of a Coronary Artery

[+] Author and Article Information
Keiichi Takamizawa

e-mail: ktaka@ri.ncvc.go.jp

Yasuhide Nakayama

Department of Biomedical Engineering,
National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center Research Institute,
5-7-1 Fujishirodai, Suita,
Osaka 565-8565, Japan

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received October 26, 2011; final manuscript received October 10, 2012; accepted manuscript posted October 22, 2012; published online May 16, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Krishna Garikipati.

J. Appl. Mech 80(4), 041006 (May 16, 2013) (6 pages) Paper No: JAM-11-1398; doi: 10.1115/1.4007863 History: Received October 26, 2011; Revised October 10, 2012; Accepted October 22, 2012

In earlier studies on stress distribution in arteries, a monolayer wall model was often used. An arterial wall consists of three layers, the intima, the media, and the adventitia. The intima is mechanically negligible as a stress supporting layer against the blood pressure in young healthy vessels, although it is important as an interface between blood and arterial wall. The media and adventitia layers are considered to support blood pressure. Recently, residual strain and a constitutive law for porcine coronary arteries have been investigated in separated media and adventitia. Using the data obtained through these investigations, a stress analysis considering residual stress (strain) in each layer was performed in this study, and residual strain and stress were computed for a bilayer model. The circumferential residual stress was compressive in the inner region, tensile in the outer region, and had discontinuity at the boundary between the media and adventitia. A peak circumferential stress occurred in the media at the boundary between the media and adventitia under a physiological condition, and an almost flat distribution was obtained in the adventitia. This pattern does not change under a hypertensive condition. These results suggest that a remodeling with hypertension occurs in the media.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Schematic drawing of stress-free state of adventitia and media, and loaded state of intact vessel

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Distributions of strain (a) and stress (b) in the vessel wall under unloaded condition. The boundary between media and adventitia is a position where the discontinuity of distributions of strain and stress appears.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Curves of outer radius versus intraluminal pressure (a) and axial force versus intraluminal pressure (b)

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Distributions of strain (a) and stress (b) at intraluminal pressure of 16 kPa (120 mmHg). The boundary between media and adventitia is a position where the discontinuity of distributions of strain and stress appears.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Distributions of strain (a) and stress (b) at intraluminal pressure of 24 kPa (180 mmHg). The boundary between media and adventitia is a position where the discontinuity of distributions of strain and stress appears.

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