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Research Articles

Simulation of Natural Pisa Clay Using an Enhanced Anisotropic Elastoplastic Bounding Surface Model

[+] Author and Article Information
Jianhong Jiang

Associate Professor
School of Urban Rail Transportation,
Soochow University,
178 Ganjiang East Road,
215021 Suzhou, PRC
e-mail: jianhong.jiang@suda.edu.cn

Hoe I. Ling

Professor
Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics,
Columbia University,
500 West 120th Street,
Mail Code 4709, New York, NY 10027
e-mail: hil9@columbia.edu

Victor N. Kaliakin

Associate Professor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,
University of Delaware,
Newark, DE 19716
e-mail: kaliakin@udel.edu

1Formerly, Graduate Student, Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Columbia University.

Manuscript received January 27, 2012; final manuscript received March 18, 2012; accepted manuscript posted October 30, 2012; published online February 5, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Younane Abousleiman.

J. Appl. Mech 80(2), 024503 (Feb 05, 2013) (5 pages) Paper No: JAM-12-1037; doi: 10.1115/1.4007964 History: Received January 27, 2012; Revised March 18, 2012

The experimental behavior of natural Pisa clay under complex stress paths is simulated by an enhanced anisotropic elastoplastic bounding surface model. In its present application, the model has nine parameters and focuses on the basic features of clay behavior, such as yielding, critical state, overconsolidation and plastic anisotropy. The model is first calibrated against the test results obtained from tri-axial compression tests and subsequently used to predict the behavior of true tri-axial tests. The overall agreement between the model predictions and the experimental data is very good for proportional loading tests in both meridional and deviatoric stress spaces. The result of prediction is also compared with the original simulations that were conducted by an advanced clay model.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Stress paths for drained tri-axial tests on natural Pisa clay in the p-q plane: (a) axisymmetric tri-axial tests, (b) true tri-axial tests (after Callisto et al. [13])

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Comparison of model simulations and experimental results for drained axisymmetric tri-axial tests on natural Pisa clay: (a) test A0; (b) test A30; (c) test A60; (d) test A90; (e) test A135; (f) test A180; (g) test A280; (h) test A315.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Comparison of model simulations and experimental results for drained true tri-axial tests on natural Pisa clay: (a) test T0; (b) test T30; (c) test T60; (d) test T90; (e) test T120; (f) test T150; (g) test T180.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Comparison of experimental results and model simulations (T0 and A90)

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