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Research Articles

Anisotropic Porochemoelectroelastic Solution for an Inclined Wellbore Drilled in Shale

[+] Author and Article Information
Minh H. Tran

Mewbourne School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering,
The Integrated PoroMechanics Institute,
The University of Oklahoma,
100 East Boyd St.,
Sarkeys Energy Center, Suite P119,
Norman, OK 73019-1014
e-mail: tranhaminh83@ou.edu

Younane N. Abousleiman

Mewbourne School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering,
Conocophillips School of Geology and Geophysics,
School of Civil Engineering and Environmental Science,
The Integrated PoroMechanics Institute,
The University of Oklahoma,
100 East Boyd St.,
Sarkeys Energy Center, Suite P119,
Norman, OK 73019-1014
e-mail: yabousle@ou.edu

Manuscript received November 30, 2011; final manuscript received April 11, 2012; accepted manuscript posted October 25, 2012; published online February 7, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Robert M. McMeeking.

J. Appl. Mech 80(2), 020912 (Feb 07, 2013) (14 pages) Paper No: JAM-11-1454; doi: 10.1115/1.4007925 History: Received November 30, 2011; Revised April 11, 2012

The porochemoelectroelastic analytical models have been used to describe the response of chemically active and electrically charged saturated porous media such as clay soils, shales, and biological tissues. However, existing studies have ignored the anisotropic nature commonly observed on these porous media. In this work, the anisotropic porochemoelectroelastic theory is presented. Then, the solution for an inclined wellbore drilled in transversely isotropic shale formations subjected to anisotropic far-field stresses with time-dependent down-hole fluid pressure and fluid activity is derived. Numerical examples illustrating the combined effects of porochemoelectroelastic behavior and anisotropy on wellbore responses are also included. The analysis shows that ignoring either the porochemoelectroelastic effects or the formation anisotropy leads to inaccurate prediction of the near-wellbore pore pressure and effective stress distributions. Finally, wellbore responses during a leak-off test conducted soon after drilling are analyzed to demonstrate the versatility of the solution in simulating complex down-hole conditions.

Copyright © 2013 by ASME
Topics: Pressure , Fluids , Drilling , Stress
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References

Figures

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Fig. 4

The condition at wellbore drilling

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Fig. 3

The initial equilibrium condition of shale formation

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Fig. 2

The far-field stress components expressed in wellbore coordinate [22]

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Fig. 1

Geological and wellbore coordinates

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Fig. 13

Effective radial stress along the direction of maximum horizontal stress at t = 15 min

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Fig. 14

Effective tangential stress along the direction of maximum horizontal stress at t = 15 min

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Fig. 15

Effective radial stress along the direction of maximum horizontal stress at t = 15 min and CEC = 5, 10, 15 meq./100 gs

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Fig. 5

Effective tangential stress along θ = 90 deg, identical to results in Ref. [19]

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Fig. 6

Effective axial stress along θ = 90 deg, identical to results in Ref. [19]

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Fig. 20

Typical mud pressure and mud salinity history during drilling and leak-off test

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Fig. 7

Effective radial stress when using Deffa = 9.6 × 10−12 (m2/s) and Deffc = 1.47 × 10−11 (m2/s), the results does not reduce of that of Ref. [11]

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Fig. 8

Effective tangential stress when using Deffa = 9.6 × 10−12 (m2/s) and Deffc = 1.47 × 10−11 (m2/s), the results does not reduce of that of Ref. [11]

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Fig. 9

Effective tangential stress, identical to results in Ref. [11] when using Deffa = 2.53 × 10−10 (m2/s) and Deffc = 3.86 × 10−10 (m2/s)

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Fig. 11

Pore pressure along the direction of maximum horizontal stress at t = 15 min

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Fig. 12

Pore pressure along the direction of maximum horizontal stress at various times

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Fig. 16

Effective radial stress along the direction of maximum horizontal stress at t = 15 min with ν1 = 0.13, 0.2, 0.25, and ν3 = 0.3

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Fig. 17

Effective radial stress along the direction of maximum horizontal stress at t = 15 min with E1 = 7.4, 6.6, 5.8 (GPa) and E3 = 4.2 (GPa)

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Fig. 18

Effective tangential stress along the direction of maximum horizontal stress at t = 15 min with ν1 = 0.13, 0.2, 0.25, and ν3 = 0.3

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Fig. 19

Effective tangential stress along the direction of maximum horizontal stress at t = 15 min with E1 = 7.4, 6.6, 5.8 (GPa) and E3 = 4.2 (GPa)

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Fig. 21

Pore pressure distribution (θ = 0 deg) at various times

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Fig. 22

Effective radial stress distribution (θ = 0 deg) at various times

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Fig. 10

Effective tangential stress, identical to results in Ref. [11] when using Deffa = 2.53 × 10−10 (m2/s) and Deffc = 3.86 × 10−10 (m2/s)

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Fig. 23

Effective tangential stress distribution (θ = 0 deg) at various time

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