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Research Articles

Poroelastic Analysis of Partial Freezing in Cohesive Porous Materials

[+] Author and Article Information
Teddy Fen-Chong

Tenure Researcher of IFSTTAR,
Laboratoire Navier
(UMR CNRS, ENPC, IFSTTAR),
Université Paris-Est,
F-77420France
e-mail: teddy.fen-chong@ifsttar.fr

Antonin Fabbri

Tenure Researcher of ENTPE,
Laboratoire Génie Civil et Bâtiment (LGCB),
F-69518France
e-mail: antonin.fabbri@entpe.fr

Mickaël Thiery

Tenure Researcher of IFSTTAR,
IFSTTAR/MAT,
Université Paris-Est,
F-75732France
e-mail: mickael.thiery@ifsttar.fr

Patrick Dangla

Tenure Researcher of IFSTTAR,
Laboratoire Navier (UMR CNRS),
Université Paris-Est,
F-77420France
e-mail: patrick.dangla@ifsttar.fr

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received August 7, 2011; final manuscript received March 20, 2012; accepted manuscript posted October 25, 2012; published online February 7, 2013. Assoc. Editor: Younane Abousleiman.

J. Appl. Mech 80(2), 020910 (Feb 07, 2013) (8 pages) Paper No: JAM-11-1273; doi: 10.1115/1.4007908 History: Received August 07, 2011; Revised March 20, 2012

We revisit the poromechanics set up by Olivier Coussy for better understanding of the mechanical effect of partial freezing in cohesive porous materials. This approach proves to be able to quantitatively predict swelling even if the in-pore liquid does not expand when solidifying. In this case, dilation results from the so-called cryosuction process that dominates thermal shrinkage under cooling, as shown in our analysis conducted on the historical experiment run by Beaudoin and MacInnis (1974, “The Mechanism of Frost Damage in Hardened Cement Paste,” Cem. Concr. Res., 4, pp. 139–147) on benzene saturated 24-h old cement paste. Both mechanisms are also at work when freezing water saturated early age cement paste with air voids. In this case, the cryosuction process results in shrinkage and should be added to the thermal shrinkage, their respective amplitudes being temperature dependent but, a priori, of the same order of magnitude.

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References

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

Effect of the assumptions on δS and Σf on the value of the capillary pressure for liquid water and ice

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

Effect of the assumptions on δS and Σf on the value of the capillary pressure for liquid and solid benzene

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

Reconstructed pore radii distribution of the cement paste used in Ref. [1]. The total porosity ϕ0 is about 52%.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Simulation of the effect of the initial liquid saturation on the SS[T] curve for the cement paste used in Ref. [1]. The plain lines are for the water system while the dotted lines are for the benzene system.

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Fig. 5

Microstructure evolution with hydration of the cement paste used in Ref. [1]

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Fig. 6

Poroelastic properties evolution with hydration of the cement paste used in Ref. [1]

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Fig. 7

Frozen benzene saturation evolution with temperature, assuming an initial liquid saturation of 80% for the cement paste used in Ref. [1]. The fitted curve is given by Eq. (32). The curve from MIP comes from the SS[TS − T] curve at SL0 = 0.8 for benzene in Fig. 4.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 8

Strain evolution under freezing for cement paste with benzene. Here ΔT = Ts − T in K or  °C. Between 0 and A, the thermal shrinkage prevails whereas between A and B the cryosuction process predominates giving rise to unexpected swelling.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 9

Estimation of the deviation from the isodeformation of pores for cement paste with benzene under freezing. Here ΔT = Ts − T in K or  °C.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 10

Reconstructed liquid water saturation evolution for the cement paste used in Ref. [21], here assumed to be fully saturated with water, ΔT = Ts − T in K or  °C. This curve is fitted from the SS[TS − T] curve at SL0 = 1 for water in Fig. 4.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 11

Strain evolution under freezing for air-entrained, water saturated cement paste, ΔT = Ts − T in K or °C. Depending on the values of the poroelastic coefficients, the thermal strain can indeed be the main cause of the shrinkage of the sample, here from ΔT≃9°C.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 12

Estimation of the deviation from the isodeformation of pores for air-entrained, water saturated cement paste under freezing, ΔT = Ts − T in K or  °C

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