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Research Papers

Internal Ballistics Simulation of a NAWC Tactical SRM

[+] Author and Article Information
Enrico Cavallini

Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering,  Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 18, 00184 - Rome, Italyenrico.cavallini@uniroma1.it

B. Favini

Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering,  Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 18, 00184 - Rome, Italybernardo.favini@uniroma1.it

M. Di Giacinto

Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering,  Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 18, 00184 - Rome, Italymaurizio.digiacinto@uniroma1.it

F. Serraglia

Ph. D. Propulsion and System Engineer, VEGA Integrated Project Team, ESA-ESRIN, via Galileo Galilei, 00044 - Frascati Rome, Italyferruccio.serraglia@esa.int

J. Appl. Mech 78(5), 051018 (Aug 05, 2011) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004295 History: Received November 26, 2010; Revised April 15, 2011; Published August 05, 2011; Online August 05, 2011

In the design and development of solid propellant rocket motors, the use of numerical tools able to predict the behavior of a given motor is particularly important in order to decrease the planning times and costs. This paper is devoted to present the results of the internal ballistics numerical simulation of the NAWC tactical motor n. 6, from ignition to burn-out, by means of a quasi-one-dimensional unsteady numerical simulation model, SPINBALL, coupled with a three-dimensional grain burnback model, GREG. In particular, the attention is focused on the effects on the SRM behavior of the erosive burning, total pressure drops and the cause of the pressure overpeak occurring during the last part of the ignition transient. The final objective is to develop an analysis/simulation capability of SRM internal ballistics for the entire combustion time with simplified physical models, in order to have reduced the computational costs, but ensuring an accuracy greater than the one usually given by zero-dimensional models. The results of the simulations indicate a very good agreement with the experimental data, as no attempt of submodels calibration is made, enforcing the ability of the proposed approach to predict the SRMs internal flow-field conditions. The numerical simulations show that NAWC n. 6 internal ballistics is completely led by the erosive burning, that is the root cause of the pressure peak occurring immediately after the SRM start-up.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

NAWC Motor n.6 mandrel geometry

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Figure 2

NAWC Motor n. 6 GREG initial grain burning surface

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Figure 3

Burning surface convergence analysis and comparison with Rocgrain code [10]

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Figure 4

Bore volume convergence analysis and comparison with Rocgrain code [10]

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Figure 5

Wet surface grid convergence analysis

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Figure 6

NAWC Motor n. 6 grain burning surface evolution

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Figure 7

HEP experimental/numerical: 0D quasi steady and Rocballist0D [13]

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Figure 8

HEP experimental/numerical: 0D model with modified APN law

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Figure 9

HEP experimental/numerical: SPINBALL and other codes [11,13]

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Figure 10

Burning rate versus SRM axis: overall (BR), APN and erosive for different instants

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Figure 11

Mach number field and port area geometry for different instants

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Figure 12

HEP experimental/numerical no erosive burning: SPINBALL and other codes [13,11]

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