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Research Papers

Experimental Investigation on Dynamic Crack Propagating Perpendicularly Through Interface in Glass

[+] Author and Article Information
Hwun Park1

 Graduate Student School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907hpark@purdue.edu

Weinong W. Chen

 School of Aeronautics and Astronautics/Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907wchen@purdue.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Appl. Mech 78(5), 051013 (Aug 05, 2011) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004283 History: Received November 24, 2010; Revised May 24, 2011; Published August 05, 2011; Online August 05, 2011

Dynamic crack propagation across a perpendicular interface in a glass specimen was investigated to understand the interaction between the crack and the interface under impact loading. The glass specimen was composed of two glass plates in an edge-to-edge configuration with an adhesive layer in between. One of the plates had a notch for a plastic projectile to strike. A single crack developed from the notch tip, and propagated perpendicularly into the interface. The patterns of crack propagation across the interface depend on the adhesive conditions on the interface. Within a range of impact speeds, the crack is arrested at the interface without any adhesive. The crack passes across a firmly bonded interface with little obstruction by the interface. The crack branches into multiple cracks after it passes through a thicker interface filled with adhesive. Projectiles having higher kinetic energies cause more severe crack branching after the crack extends into the second glass plate.

Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Configuration of equipments

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Figure 2

Dimension of a projectile and specimen

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Figure 3

Crack propagation in a specimen without an interface (projectile: 55 g, 171 m/s, kinetic energy: 804 J)

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Figure 4

Crack speed at both glass plates measured from each frame of high-speed camera

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Figure 5

Crack propagation through an interface without an adhesive layer (projectile: 217 g, 212 m/s, kinetic energy: 4880 J)

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Figure 6

Crack propagation through an interface having a near-zero-thick adhesive layer (projectile: 81 g, 265 m/s, kinetic energy: 2840 J)

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Figure 7

Crack speed variation versus crack growth and crack profile of a specimen having a near-zero-thick adhesive layer (projectile: 81 g, 265 m/s, kinetic energy: 2840 J)

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Figure 8

Crack propagation through an interface having a 0.13 mm-thick adhesive layer (projectile: 81 g, 264 m/s, kinetic energy: 2820 J)

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Figure 9

Crack speed variation versus crack growth and crack profile of a specimen having a 0.13 mm-thick adhesive layer (projectile: 81 g, 264 m/s, kinetic energy: 2820 J)

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Figure 10

Crack propagation through an interface having a 2.5 mm-thick adhesive (projectile: 83 g, 259 m/s, kinetic energy: 2780 J)

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Figure 11

Crack speed variation versus crack growth and crack profile of a specimen having a 2.5 mm-thick adhesive (projectile: 83 g, 259 m/s, kinetic energy: 2780 J)

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Figure 12

Crack propagation through an interface having a 0.25 mm-thick adhesive (projectile: 76 g, 660 m/s, kinetic energy: 16,600 J)

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Figure 13

Crack tip locations versus time for specimens having interfaces of various thickness

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Figure 14

Crack speed variation versus crack growth of a specimen having a 10.9 mm-thick adhesive (projectile: 88 g, 259 m/s, kinetic energy: 2950 J)

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Figure 15

Crack propagation through an interface having a near-zero-thick adhesive layer and transition of fracture surface roughness across the interface (projectile: 81 g, 265 m/s, kinetic energy: 2840 J)

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