0
Research Papers

A New Experimental Method for the Introduction of a Predetermined Amount of Residual Stresses in Fatigue Test Specimens

[+] Author and Article Information
Daniel Paquet

 Ohio State University, Scott Laboratory, 209 West 19th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210

Jacques Lanteigne1

Hydro-Quebec Research Institute (IREQ), Varennes, QC J3X 1S1 Canadalanteigne.jacques@ireq.ca

Marie Bernard

Mechanical Engineering, École Polytechnique de Montréal, Montreal, QC H3T 1J4 Canada

1

Corresponding author.

J. Appl. Mech 79(6), 061002 (Sep 14, 2012) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4006489 History: Received March 01, 2010; Revised January 13, 2012; Posted March 29, 2012; Published September 14, 2012; Online September 14, 2012

A new experimental method for the incorporation of residual stresses (RS) in standard fatigue steels specimens was developed. RS were introduced by means of high frequency (360 kHz) induction heating. Surface tensile RS resulted from cooling down the specimen subjected to a high thermal gradient. To preserve the mechanical properties of the steel, it was necessary to circulate a coolant at the center of the specimen. The 304L austenitic stainless steel does not undergo phase transformation nor micro structural changes in the solid state and was thus selected for this purpose. Multiphysics finite element (FE) analysis was used to calculate the distributed RS in the fatigue samples. These calculations were compared to XRD measurements and a very good agreement was obtained. It was therefore demonstrated that RS induced with induction heating could be numerically assessed. This conditioning method was then proved efficient to study the only influence of a predetermined amount of RS on the fatigue properties of austenitic 304L steel without undergoing influences of other parameters such as microstructure, surface finish and geometry.

Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Variation of yield strength SY of steel 304L with temperature

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Variation of Young’s Modulus E of steel 304L with temperature

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Temperature variation at the outer surface and at a depth of 0.76 mm beneath the surface of the channel of the 304L steel calibration specimen, for 1.94 s heating time

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Released strains obtained from drilling the calibration specimen subjected to a heating time of 1.94 s

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Electromagnetic-thermal coupling for the numerical modeling of the induction heating

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Physical dimensions of the model used for the numerical simulation

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Resistivity of the 304L steel [19]

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Specific heat of the 304L steel [20]

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Thermal conductivity of 304L steel [21]

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Tensile curves of 304L steel (portion for strain below 0.5%)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Thermal expansion coefficient of 304L steel [22]

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Mesh for the electromagnetic-thermal problem

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Temperature variation at the outer surface of the specimen and at the inner surface, as obtained from the simulation

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Electrical field distribution after heating 1.4 s (expressed in V/m or N/C): (a) the model as a whole (b) the sample only

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Temperature distribution after heating (expressed in °C)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Position of the TC for validating the numerical model

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 17

Validation of the temporal temperature at the center and at the surface (a) in a 20 s time frame (b) in a 4 s time frame

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 18

Validation of the temporal temperature distribution at the center of the specimen at r = 2.075 mm

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 19

Validation of the surface temporal temperature distribution at distance of 5 mm from the center of the specimen (a) in a 20 s time frame (b) in a 4 s time frame

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 20

Validation of the surface temporal temperature distribution at a distance of 10 mm from the center of the specimen

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 21

FE results: axial RS distribution, 1.4 s heating time, 38.6 s cooling time (MPa)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 22

Validation of the thermomechanical simulation with XRD measurements

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 23

Temperature distribution at various time steps

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 24

Radial stress distribution at various time steps

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 25

Tangential stress distribution at various time steps

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 26

Longitudinal stress distribution at various time steps

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In