0
Research Papers

Geometrical Anisotropy in Biphase Particle Reinforced Composites

[+] Author and Article Information
Shivakumar I. Ranganathan

Department of Nanomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 1825 Pressler, Houston, TX 77030shivakumar.ranganathan@uth.tmc.edu

Paolo Decuzzi1

Department of Nanomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 1825 Pressler, Houston, TX 77030paolo.decuzzi@uth.tmc.edu

Lewis T. Wheeler2

Department of Nanomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 1825 Pressler, Houston, TX 77030lwheeler@uh.edu

Mauro Ferrari3

Department of Nanomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 1825 Pressler, Houston, TX 77030mauro.ferrari@uth.tmc.edu

1

Corresponding author. Also at Center of Bio-/Nanotechnology and Bio-/Engineering for Medicine, University of Magna Graecia, Viale Europa, LOC. Germaneto, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy.

2

Also at Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Engineering Building One, Houston, TX 77204.

3

Also at Department of Experimental Therapeutics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030; Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005.

J. Appl. Mech 77(4), 041017 (Apr 19, 2010) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000928 History: Received August 11, 2009; Revised October 09, 2009; Published April 19, 2010; Online April 19, 2010

Particle shape plays a crucial role in the design of novel reinforced composites. We introduce the notion of a geometrical anisotropy index A to characterize the particle shape and establish its relationship with the effective elastic constants of biphase composite materials. Our analysis identifies three distinct regions of A: (i) By using ovoidal particles with small A, the effective stiffness scales linearly with A for a given volume fraction α; (ii) for intermediate values of A, the use of prolate particles yield better elastic properties; and (iii) for large A, the use of oblate particles result in higher effective stiffness. Interestingly, the transition from (ii) to (iii) occurs at a critical anisotropy Acr and is independent of α.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

(a) (EP/EO) as a function of log10(1+A), and (b) (GP/GO) as a function of log10(1+A)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

(a) Normalized elastic moduli of the composite material as a function of A and α. (b) Normalized shear moduli of the composite material as a function of A and α.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

(a) Iso-E (GPa) contours in the (k1,k2) space for α=0.01 and 0.2. (b) Iso-G (GPa) contours in the (k1,k2) space for α=0.01 and 0.2.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Contours of constant geometric anisotropy index A in the (k1,k2) space

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In