0
Research Papers

Multi-Order Stress Intensity Factors Along Three-Dimensional Interface Corners

[+] Author and Article Information
Tai-Liang Kuo, Chyanbin Hwu

Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 70101, Taiwan, R.O.C.

J. Appl. Mech 77(3), 031020 (Mar 05, 2010) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4000411 History: Received June 24, 2008; Revised December 19, 2008; Published March 05, 2010; Online March 05, 2010

Usually in the study of singularity problems, only the most critical singular order is considered. For three-dimensional interface corner problems, if only the most critical singular order of stresses is considered, it is possible to lose the opportunity to compute the full modes of stress intensity factors. To fully understand the failure behavior of three-dimensional interface corners, a definition of the stress intensity factors for the lower singular orders is proposed in this paper based on that of the most critical singular order. Moreover, to compute the proposed multi-order stress intensity factors accurately and efficiently, a path-independent H-integral, which has been proven useful for the two-dimensional interface corners, is now modified into a domain-independent H-integral for the three-dimensional interface corner problems. Because the stress intensity factors characterize the fracture behavior focused on an arbitrary tip along the corner front, based on anisotropic elasticity the near tip solutions and complementary solutions of two-dimensional generalized plane strain problems are introduced and then utilized for computation of three-dimensional H-integral. To illustrate the validity of the present work, several three-dimensional numerical examples are analyzed and compared with the existing published solutions. Finally, two examples about the interface corners, which occur frequently in electric packages, are solved to show the feasibility and practicability of the proposed approach.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Special wedges yielding only mode I stress intensity factor: (a) a single wedge made up of specially orthotropic materials whose principal material axes are aligned with the nature body axes and (b) a biwedge composed of two unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites whose properties are the same but fiber orientations are opposite with respect to x1-axis

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Special wedges yielding only modes I and II stress intensity factors: (a) a single wedge made up of generally orthotropic materials whose principal material axes are not aligned with the nature body axes, (b) a biwedge composed of two dissimilar orthotropic materials, and (c) a biwedge composed of two dissimilar shaped wedges

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Representative cornered body and illustrations of the constitutive surface and contours

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

A through-thickness edge notch in a homogeneous isotropic material subjected to remote tension

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

A penny-shaped interface crack between two dissimilar isotropic materials subjected to remote tension

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

(a) Three rectangular integral domains for a penny-shaped interface crack and (b) dimensions of the integral domains

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

A through-thickness interface corner between two dissimilar materials subjected to remote tension

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Stress intensity factors for a through-thickness interface corner between two dissimilar materials subjected to remote tension

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Stress intensity factors for a through-thickness interface corner calculated directly from the definitions, Eqs. 23,33: (a) KI, (b) KII, and (c)KIII

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

A representative block of electronic package and the dimensions of each portion

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Possible locations of the interface corners appeared in electronic device

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In