0
Research Papers

An Experimental Study on the Influence of Vortex Generators on the Shock-Induced Boundary Layer Separation at M=1.4

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Zare Shahneh

School of Engineering and Material Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS, U.K.a.shahneh@qmul.ac.uk

F. Motallebi

School of Engineering and Material Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS, U.K.f.motallebi@qmul.ac.uk

J. Appl. Mech 76(4), 041009 (Apr 23, 2009) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3086591 History: Received March 22, 2008; Revised December 29, 2008; Published April 23, 2009

The results of an investigation into the effects that sub-boundary layer vortex generators (SBVGs) have on reducing normal shock-induced turbulent boundary layer separation are presented. The freestream Mach number and Reynolds number were M=1.45 and R=15.9×106/m, respectively. Total pressure profiles, static pressure distributions, surface total pressure (Preston pressure) distributions, oil flow visualization, and Schlieren photographs were used in the result analysis. The effects of SBVG height and the location upstream of the shock were investigated. A novel tetrahedron shape SBVG with different lengths (30 mm and 60 mm) was used for these experiments. The effect of streamwise location of the longer SBVG on the interaction was also investigated. The location of the shock wave was controlled by an adjustable choke mechanism located downstream of the working section. The results show that an increase in the distance for the longer SBVG from 17.4δR to 25.5δR did not remove the separation entirely, but the shorter SBVG provided higher total pressure distribution within the boundary layer in the recovery region. This also provided a healthier boundary layer profile downstream of the interaction region with lower displacement thickness and shape factor.

Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Test section and Pitot tube

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

SBVGs with 30 and 60 mm lengths. Flow direction is from left to right.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Variation in static pressure ratio along the tunnel for different configurations

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Variation in dynamic pressure ratio along the tunnel for different configurations

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Streamwise velocity profile for different configurations at x/δR=−5.36

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Streamwise velocity profile for different configurations at x/δR=−1.34

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Streamwise velocity profile for different configurations at x/δR=2.68

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Streamwise velocity profile for different configurations at x/δR=6.70

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Streamwise velocity profile for different configurations at x/δR=10.72

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Streamwise velocity profile for different configurations at x/δR=14.75

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Streamwise velocity profile for different configurations at x/δR=36.19

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Streamwise boundary layer thickness for different configurations

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Streamwise displacement thickness for different configurations

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Streamwise shape factor for different configurations

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 15

Visualization of separation: (a) baseline, (b) SS, and (c) LS. Location of shock wave is above the separation line.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 16

Schlieren visualization of the affected area: (a) baseline, (b) SS, and (c) LS

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In