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Research Papers

Nonisothermal Transient Flow in Natural Gas Pipeline

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Abbaspour

 Gregg Engineering, Inc., 403 Julie Rivers Drive, Sugar Land, TX 77479

K. S. Chapman

National Gas Machinery Laboratory, Kansas State University, 245 Levee Drive, Manhattan, KS 66502

J. Appl. Mech 75(3), 031018 (May 02, 2008) (8 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2840046 History: Received December 06, 2006; Revised August 31, 2007; Published May 02, 2008

The fully implicit finite-difference method is used to solve the continuity, momentum, and energy equations for flow within a gas pipeline. This methodology (1) incorporates the convective inertia term in the conservation of momentum equation, (2) treats the compressibility factor as a function of temperature and pressure, and (3) considers the friction factor as a function of the Reynolds number and pipe roughness. The fully implicit method representation of the equations offers the advantage of guaranteed stability for a large time step, which is very useful for gas pipeline industry. The results show that the effect of treating the gas in a nonisothermal manner is extremely necessary for pipeline flow calculation accuracies, especially for rapid transient process. It also indicates that the convective inertia term plays an important role in the gas flow analysis and cannot be neglected from the calculation.

Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Mesh of the solution

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Figure 2

Pipe information and boundary condition for flow through the valve

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Figure 3

Comparison of present work (a) with Kiuchi model (b) for Δt=1.0min

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Figure 4

Comparison of present work (a) with Kiuchi model (b) for Δt=0.1min

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Figure 5

Comparison of present work (a) with Kiuchi model (b) for Δt=0.01min

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Figure 6

Oscillation on flow rate at closing valve process for Δt=0.01min

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Figure 7

Variation of inlet flow rate without considering temporal inertia term in momentum equation Δt=0.01min

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Figure 8

Solution for isothermal model by considering convective inertia term for (a) Δt=1.0min, (b) Δt=0.1min, and (c) Δt=0.01min

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Figure 9

Comparison of the result for impact of convective inertia term and without convective inertia for Δt=0.1min

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Figure 10

Comparison of the result for impact of convective inertia term and without convective inertia for different flow rates and Δt=0.1min

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Figure 11

Variation of temperature (a) and Joule–Thompson coefficient (b) along the pipe with respect to time

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Figure 12

Temperature comparison for current study and Coulter–Bardon equation

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Figure 13

Temperature boundary condition at Node 1

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Figure 14

Solution for nonisothermal condition for (a) Δt=1.0min, (b) Δt=0.1min, and (c) Δt=0.01min

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Figure 15

Comparison of the result for impact of convective inertia term (isothermal) and nonisothermal condition for Δt=0.1min

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Figure 16

Temperature (a) and compressibility factor (b) for nonisothermal condition and Δt=0.1min

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