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Research Papers

Three-Dimensional Constitutive Creep/Relaxation Model of Carbon Cathode Materials

[+] Author and Article Information
D. Picard

Aluminium Research Centre—REGAL, Université Laval,1065 Avenue de la Médecine Quebec, QC, G1V 0A6, Canadadonald.picard@gci.ulaval.ca

M. Fafard

Aluminium Research Centre—REGAL, Université Laval,1065 Avenue de la Médecine Quebec, QC, G1V 0A6, Canadamario.fafard@gci.ulaval.ca

G. Soucy

Aluminium Research Centre—REGAL, Université de Sherbrooke, 2500 Boulevard Université, Sherbrooke, QC, J1K 2R1, Canadagervais.soucy@usherbrooke.ca

J.-F. Bilodeau

Alcan International, Arvida Research and Development Center, 1955 Mellon Boulevard, Saguenay, QC, G7H 4K8, Canadajean-francois.bilodeau@alcan.com

J. Appl. Mech 75(3), 031017 (May 02, 2008) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2840044 History: Received November 13, 2006; Revised November 27, 2007; Published May 02, 2008

In order to adequately simulate the behavior of a Hall–Héroult electrolysis cell, a finite element model must take into account the properties of each material forming the cell structure and those contained in it. However, there is some lack of full knowledge of the mechanical behavior of these materials, e.g., the long term viscoelastic (creep/relaxation) behavior of the carbon cathode. In this present paper, a three-dimensional viscoelastic model is devised and proposed, being ready to be implemented in a finite element code. This 3D viscoelastic model was developed from the thermodynamics of irreversible processes, where the selection of the model’s internal variables was based on a phenomenological approach. The model has been developed at a particular reference state; therefore, the model parameters are represented by constant constitutive tensors. The model’s particular parameters were identified for three different types of cathode carbon, i.e., semigraphitic, graphitic, and graphitized.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 5

Parameter’s identification of the GQ carbon material

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Figure 6

Parameter’s identification of the GZ carbon material

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Figure 7

Hydrostatic and deviatoric creep mechanisms for the SG material. (–⋅–) hydrostatic creep strain of the anelastic mechanism α; (– –) deviatoric creep strain of the anelastic mechanism α; (- - -) total hydrostatic creep strain; (–⋅⋅–) total deviatoric creep strain; (—) total creep strain.

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Figure 8

Hydrostatic and deviatoric creep mechanisms for the GQ material. (–⋅–) hydrostatic creep strain of the anelastic mechanism α; (– –) deviatoric creep strain of the anelastic mechanism α; (- - -) total hydrostatic creep strain; (–⋅⋅–) total deviatoric creep strain; (—) total creep strain.

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Figure 9

Hydrostatic and deviatoric creep mechanisms for the graphitized material. (–⋅–) hydrostatic creep strain of the anelastic mechanism α; (– –) deviatoric creep strain of the anelastic mechanism α; (- - -) total hydrostatic creep strain; (–⋅⋅–) total deviatoric creep strain; (—) total creep strain.

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Figure 10

Creep Poisson’s ratio of the SG material, based on Eq. 37

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Figure 4

Parameter’s identification of the SG carbon material

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Figure 3

Parameter’s identification of the SG carbon material with axial strains only

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Figure 2

Diagram of the three-dimensional viscoelastic rheological model

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Figure 1

Diagram of the Hall–Héroult electrolysis cell (6)

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