0
Research Papers

The LEFM Concept for Interfacial Cracks Application to the Problem of Coating Delamination on Cylindrical Substrates

[+] Author and Article Information
Ruzica R. Nikolic

Faculty of Mechanical Engineering,  University of Kragujevac, Sestre Janjic 6, 34000 Kragujevac, Serbia;  University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26 Zilina, Slovakia ruzicarnikolic@yahoo.com

Jelena M. Djokovic

Technical Faculty of Bor,  University of Belgrade, Vojske Jugoslavije 12, 19210 Bor, Serbiajelenarapp@gmail.com

J. Appl. Mech 79(3), 031005 (Apr 05, 2012) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4005893 History: Received July 01, 2011; Revised January 19, 2012; Posted February 13, 2012; Published April 04, 2012; Online April 05, 2012

In this paper the delamination of coating subjected to compressive stress on a cylindrical substrate is considered. This problem is particularly interesting in oxide coatings on wire elements exposed to extreme temperatures and in ceramic coatings on turbine engine blades or other components that operate at high temperatures. Using the results of Hutchinson (Hutchinson, 2001, “Delamination of Compressed Films on Curved Substrates,” J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 49 , pp. 1847–1864) the aforementioned problem is discussed from the aspect of application of the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) concept for an interfacial crack. The energy release rate and mode mixity for the case of the coating delamination in the axial and radial directions are determined. It is shown that the results also depend on whether the substrate is convex or concave. Delamination in the radial direction in the case of the concave substrate is harder, but it is more likely when the substrate is convex. Delamination in the axial direction is equally likely in both cases. The results presented in this paper justify the application of the concept of linear elastic fracture mechanics for an interfacial crack for explaining the influence of the elastic characteristics of the substrate on the buckling delamination of the coating.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2012 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Four cases of coating delamination on cylindrical substrate

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

The blister geometry: (a) axial direction, (b) radial direction, and (c) tractions

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Normalized energy release rate along sides of the blister as a function of σ/σc for the case of blister propagation in the axial direction for different values of R, h, and b

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Mode mixity ψ, as a function of σ/σc for the case of blister propagation in the axial direction

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Normalized energy release rate at the front of the blister as a function of σ/σc for the case of blister propagation in the axial direction, for different values of R, h, and b

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Normalized energy release rate along sides of the blister as a function of σ/σc for the case of the blister propagation in the radial direction, for different values of R, h, and b

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Mode mixity ψ as a function of σ/σc for the case of the blister propagation in the radial direction

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Normalized energy release rate at the front of the blister as a function of σ/σc for the case of the blister propagation in the radial direction, for different values of R, h, and b

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

The wet label on the convex surface (mineral water bottle)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

The wet label on the concave surface (the interior side of a glass)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Dependence of the ratio Ψ on σ/σc, for different values of the parameter λ, for the flat substrate

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In