0
Technical Briefs

Quantifying the Anisotropy in Biological Materials

[+] Author and Article Information
Shivakumar I. Ranganathan

 Department of Mechanical Engineering, American University of Sharjah, Sharjah, 26666, United Arabic Emirates e-mail: sranganathan@aus.edu

Martin Ostoja-Starzewski1

 Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Institute for Condensed Matter Theory, Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 e-mail: martinos@illinois.edu The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, 6670 Bertner St., M.S. R2-216, Houston, TX 77030; President, Alliance for Nanohealth, Houston, TX 77030 e-mail: mferrari@tmhs.org

Mauro Ferrari

 Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Institute for Condensed Matter Theory, Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 e-mail: martinos@illinois.edu The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, 6670 Bertner St., M.S. R2-216, Houston, TX 77030; President, Alliance for Nanohealth, Houston, TX 77030 e-mail: mferrari@tmhs.org

1

Corresponding author: Martin Ostoja-Starzewski, martinos@illinois.edu.

J. Appl. Mech 78(6), 064501 (Aug 25, 2011) (4 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004553 History: Received May 27, 2010; Revised November 07, 2010; Posted July 11, 2011; Published August 25, 2011; Online August 25, 2011

Anisotropy is an essential attribute exhibited by most biological materials. Based on the recent work on anisotropy of a wide range of crystals and polycrystals, we propose an appropriate measure (A) to quantify the extent of elastic anisotropy in biomaterials by accounting the tensorial nature (both stiffness-based and compliance-based) of their elastic properties. Next, we derive a relationship between A and an empirically defined existing measure. Also, the preceding measure is used to quantify the extent of anisotropy in select biological materials that include bone, dentitional tissues, and a variety of woods. Our results indicate that woods are an order of magnitude more anisotropic than hard tissues and apatites. Finally, based on the available data, it is found that the anisotropy in human femur increases by over 40% when measured between 30% and 70% of the total femur length.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Association of Physics Teachers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Methodology to derive the anisotropy index

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Contours of iso-A in the (AC , AS ) space

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Variation of anisotropy (A) as a function of position (Z/L) in a human femur (data obtained from Ref. [15])

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

(a): Placement of hard tissues and apatites in the (GV/GR,KV/KR) space. The iso-A lines appear as straight lines with a slope of -5 (data obtained from [(10),11]). (b): Placement of a variety of woods in the (GV/GR,KV/KR) space. The iso-A lines appear as straight lines with a slope of -5 (data obtained from Refs. [10,11]).

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In