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Research Papers

Three-Dimensional Underwater Shock Response of Composite Marine Structures

[+] Author and Article Information
Michael R. Motley

Postdoctoral Fellow e-mail: mmotley@umich.edu

Yin L. Young1

Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering,  University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 ylyoung@umich.edu15270 Voss Road, Sugar Land, TX 77498ylyoung@umich.edu

Zhanke Liu

Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering,  University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 15270 Voss Road, Sugar Land, TX 77498

1

Corresponding author.

J. Appl. Mech 78(6), 061013 (Aug 25, 2011) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4004525 History: Received December 17, 2009; Revised July 05, 2011; Posted July 06, 2011; Published August 25, 2011; Online August 25, 2011

In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the use of advanced composites in marine applications. It has been shown that by exploiting the inherent anisotropic nature of the material, fiber-reinforced composite structures can be tailored to allow automatic, passive, three-dimensional (3D) adaptive/morphing capabilities such that they outperform their rigid counterparts both hydrodynamically and structurally. Much of the current research on the shock response of composite structures focuses on air-backed structures with fixed-fixed or simply supported boundary conditions. Nevertheless, many critical components of marine structures where adaptive/morphing capabilities are needed are cantilevered-type structures, including propeller and turbine blades, hydrofoils, and rudders. This paper investigates the 3D transient response of cantilevered, anisotropic, composite marine structures, namely, fully submerged cantilevered plates, subject to a range of shock loads. Structural responses and the initial failure loads of a composite plate are compared with a nickel-aluminum-bronze plate. Discussions of the fluid and structural responses of both materials are presented, and the initial failure loads of both materials are compared.

Copyright © 2011 by American Association of Physics Teachers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Comparisons of the numerical and analytical front and back side pressure and displacement responses of a water-backed, rigid, freely sliding plate

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Figure 2

Schematic of the top view and elevation view of a cantilevered plate within the fluid domain subject to a planar shock wave caused by an underwater explosion

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Figure 3

Stress-strain curve for nickel-aluminum-bronze

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Figure 4

Normalized time histories of the front side pressure (a), back side pressure (b), displacement (c), and velocity (d) at key points along the midchord of the CFRP plate subject to a shock corresponding to W = 10 kg, R = 10 m

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Figure 5

Normalized time histories of the front side pressure (a), back side pressure (b), displacement (c), and velocity (d) key points along the midchord of the NAB plate subject to a shock corresponding to W = 10 kg, R = 10 m

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Figure 6

Comparison of the time histories of the normalized front side pressure of the cantilevered, elastic CFRP and NAB plates with corresponding rigid, free sliding plates subject to a shock corresponding to W = 10 kg, R = 10 m

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Figure 7

Comparison of the time histories of the normalized back side pressure of the cantilevered, elastic CFRP and NAB plates with corresponding rigid, free sliding plates subject to a shock corresponding to W = 10 kg, R = 10 m

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Figure 8

Time progression of the deflected shape, front and back side pressures along the midchord of the CFRP plate for a shock corresponding to W = 10 kg, R = 10 m

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Figure 9

Time progression of the deflected shape, front and back side pressures along the midchord of the NAB plate for a shock corresponding to W = 10 kg, R = 10 m

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Figure 10

Time progression of the normalized fluid pressure across the front and back faces of the CFRP plate subject to a shock corresponding to W = 10 kg, R = 10 m. White areas denote the presence of fluid cavitation.

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Figure 11

Time progression of the normalized fluid pressure across the front and back faces of the NAB plate subject to a shock corresponding to W = 10 kg, R = 10 m. White areas denote the presence of fluid cavitation.

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Figure 12

Comparison of the normalized time histories of the normalized front side pressures, back side pressures, and displacements for the CFRP plate subject to a range of shock loads

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Figure 13

Comparison of the normalized time histories of the normalized front side pressures, back side pressures, and displacements for the NAB plate subject to a range of shock loads

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Figure 14

Contour of the matrix tension failure indicator (FMT ) for the ten layers of the CFRP plate subject to a shock corresponding to W = 10 kg, R = 2 m at time = 0.50 ms. The plate is fixed on the right and free on the left. The shock propagates from the top.

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Figure 15

Contour of the equivalent plastic strain through the ten element layers of the NAB plate subject to a shock corresponding to W = 10 kg, R=2 m at time tto  = 0.50 ms. The plate is fixed on the right and free on the left. The shock propagates from the top.

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Figure 16

Comparison of the time progression of through-thickness material degradation at the root face of the CFRP plate (matrix tensile failure initiation) and NAB plate (equivalent plastic strain) subject to a shock corresponding to W = 10 kg, R = 2 m

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Figure 17

Comparison of the susceptibility to initial root failure of the NAB plate and CFRP plate subject to a range of shock loadings

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