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Research Papers

Surface and Interface Effects on Torsion of Eccentrically Two-Phase fcc Circular Nanorods: Determination of the Surface/Interface Elastic Properties via an Atomistic Approach

[+] Author and Article Information
Ladan Pahlevani

Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran, Iran

Hossein M. Shodja1

Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9161, Tehran, Iran; Department of Civil Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9313, Tehran, Iranshodja@sharif.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Appl. Mech 78(1), 011011 (Oct 20, 2010) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002211 History: Received March 20, 2010; Revised July 05, 2010; Posted July 23, 2010; Published October 20, 2010; Online October 20, 2010

The effect of surface and interface elasticity in the analysis of the Saint–Venant torsion problem of an eccentrically two-phase fcc circular nanorod is considered; description of the behavior of such a small structure via usual classical theories cease to hold. In this work, the problem is formulated in the context of the surface/interface elasticity. For a rigorous solution of the proposed problem, conformal mapping with a Laurent series expansion are employed together. The numerical results well illustrate that the torsional rigidity and stress distribution corresponding to such nanosized structural elements are significantly affected by the size. In order to employ surface and interface elasticity, several key properties such as surface energy, surface stresses, and surface elastic constants of several fcc materials as well as interface properties of the noncoherent fcc bicrystals are derived in terms of Rafii-Tabar and Sutton interatomic potential function. For determination of the surface/interface parameters a molecular dynamics program, which uses the above-mentioned potential function, is developed. The calculated surface and interface properties are in reasonable agreement with the corresponding results in literature. Some applications of the given results can be contemplated in the design of micro-/nano-electromechanical systems.

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Figures

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Figure 3

Variation of the relative rigidity as a function of r1 for eccentric Ni/Pd, Ni/Al, and Ni/Cu two-phase nanorods

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Figure 4

Variation of the relative rigidity as a function of r1 for Al, Pt, and Ni nanowires

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Figure 5

Variation of the relative rigidity as a function of r1 for eccentric Al, Pt, and Ni nanotubes

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Figure 6

Distribution of σ12/θμAl for Al eccentric nanotube. The solid and dashed contour lines correspond to the results obtained via the present study and continuum theory, respectively. Due to symmetry only half of the cross section is displayed.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

(a) Cross section of eccentric cylindrical nanorods and (b) cross section after mapping

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Variation of the relative rigidity as a function of r1 for eccentric Al/Ni, Al/Pt, and Al/Cu two-phase nanorods

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Distribution of σ13/θμAl for Al eccentric nanotube. The solid and dashed contour lines correspond to the results obtained via the present study and continuum theory, respectively. Due to antisymmetry only half of the cross section is displayed.

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