0
Research Papers

The Instability of Webs in Transport

[+] Author and Article Information
J. A. Beisel

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Engineering North 218, Stillwater, OK 74078

J. K. Good

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Oklahoma State University, Engineering North 218, Stillwater, OK 74078james.k.good@okstate.edu

J. Appl. Mech 78(1), 011001 (Oct 08, 2010) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4002116 History: Received June 16, 2008; Revised June 17, 2010; Posted July 07, 2010; Published October 08, 2010; Online October 08, 2010

A method is presented for determining the two levels of instability that are associated with thin web materials traveling through process machinery. The first level of instability involves the out-of-plane buckling of expanses of web supported only by rollers at opposing ends. A method is developed using linear plate theory, which is verified by tests that show that this first level of instability can be predicted. The second level of instability involves the buckling of the web when it has taken the form of a cylindrical shell as it transits a roller. A nonlinear finite element method with strain dependent constitutive relations is developed and verified by tests to predict this second level of instability.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

A web in transport through a process machine

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

An isotropic span of web between rollers

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

The instability of isotropic web span (b=a)

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

A web span between rollers i and j

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

The experimental setup

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

A comparison of predicted and tested misalignments required to produce troughs in a polyester web (h=23.4 μm(920 μin.), b=15.24 cm (6 in.), and T=28 N (6.3 lb))

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

A comparison of predicted and tested misalignments required to produce troughs in a polyester web (h=23.4 μm(920 μin.), b=15.24 cm (6 in.), and T=54.7 N (12.3 lb))

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

A typical finite element model used in wrinkling analysis

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Example model results used to predict wrinkling in a polyester web (h=23.4 μm(920 μin.), a=76.2 cm (30 in.), b=15.24 cm (6 in.), R=3.68 cm (1.45 in.), and T=73.7 N (16.6 lb))

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

The comparison of wrinkling predictions with test results for a polyester web (h=23.4 μm(920 μin.), b=15.24 cm (6 in.), and R=3.68 cm (1.45 in.))

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In