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RESEARCH PAPERS: Interior Ballistics

Experimental Study and Numerical Simulation of Propellant Ignition and Combustion for Cased Telescoped Ammunition in Chamber

[+] Author and Article Information
Xin Lu, Yanhuang Zhou, Yonggang Yu

School of Power Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, China

J. Appl. Mech 77(5), 051402 (May 17, 2010) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4001560 History: Received July 30, 2009; Revised February 04, 2010; Posted April 09, 2010; Published May 17, 2010; Online May 17, 2010

Cased telescoped ammunition (CTA) is a kind of charge structure with projectile embedded in the cartridge case. The advantages of CTA, compared with concepts using conventional ammunition, are: (1) reduced charge/ammunition volume, (2) improved performance, and (3) enhanced power and survivabillity of armament. The projectile is placed in the control tube of the cartridge before shooting. After the primer is struck, propellant product gases, generated by the igniter charge burning in the central igniter tube, drive the projectile to move forward along the control tube, and then causing the main propellants around the igniter tube and control tube to burn. Therefore, in the process of interior ballistics, there is a motion of the projectile in the control tube before the projectile engraves the rifles, in contrast with the traditional ammunition. The consistency of this motion has an important influence on the stability of CTA interior ballistic performance. The experiments on the ignition and combustion of propellants and motion of projectile in the control tube are carried out using a high-speed video recording system in this study. The projectile velocity at the entrance of the rifle is obtained from the recorded images. A two-phase flow model of CTA is also established and simulated by using the two-phase flow method and computational fluid dynamics technology. The calculated projectile velocity is in good agreement with the experimental data. The numerical results show that the developed mathematical model gives the correct trend and can provide useful calculated parameters for the structural design of CTA components.

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Copyright © 2010 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 10

Predicted velocity-time profile of projectile

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Figure 9

Predicted porosity distribution

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Figure 8

Predicted propellant velocity distribution: (a) propellant velocity in chamber and (b) propellant velocity in barrel

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Figure 7

Predicted gas velocity distribution: (a) gas velocity in chamber and (b) gas velocity in barrel

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Figure 6

Predicted pressure distribution

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Figure 5

The comparison of calculated and actual firing pressure-time profiles

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Figure 4

The variation in the projectile velocity at the outlet of the control tube versus the mass ratio of the igniter charge and projectile (the length of the control tube is 140 mm)

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Figure 3

The variation in the projectile velocity at the outlet of the control tube versus the length of the control tube (the mass ratio of the igniter charge and projectile is 0.02)

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Figure 2

A series process of the ignition and combustion of propellants and motion of projectile in control tube: (a) t=0, (b) t=1 ms, (c) t=2 ms, (d) t=3 ms, (e) t=4 ms, (f) t=5 ms

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Figure 1

A schematic diagram of the experimental device

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