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Research Papers

On Approximately Realizing and Characterizing Pure Mode-I Interface Fracture Between Bonded Dissimilar Materials

[+] Author and Article Information
Zhenyu Ouyang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern University and A&M College, Baton Rouge, LA 70813

Gefu Ji

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803

Guoqiang Li1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern University and A&M College, Baton Rouge, LA 70813; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803guoli@me.lsu.edu

1

Corresponding author.

J. Appl. Mech 78(3), 031020 (Feb 17, 2011) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003366 History: Received March 18, 2010; Revised December 27, 2010; Posted January 05, 2011; Published February 17, 2011; Online February 17, 2011

Bimaterial systems in which two dissimilar materials are adhesively joined by a thin adhesive interlayer have been widely used in a variety of modern industries and engineering structures. It is well known that interfacial fracture is the most common failure mode for these bimaterial systems. Particularly, the interface fracture is a mixed mode in nature mode-I (pure peel) and mode-II (pure shear) due to the disrupted symmetry by the bimaterial configuration. Obviously, characterizing individual fracture modes, especially mode-I fracture, is essential in understanding and modeling the complex mixed mode fracture problems. Meanwhile, the J-integral is a highly preferred means to characterize the interfacial fracture behaviors of a bimaterial system because it cannot only capture more accurate toughness value, but also facilitate an experimental characterization of interfacial traction-separation laws (cohesive laws). Motivated by these important issues, a novel idea is proposed in the present work to realize and characterize the pure mode-I nonlinear interface fracture between bonded dissimilar materials. First, a nearly pure mode-I fracture test can be simply realized for a wide range of bimaterial systems by almost eliminating the mode-II component based on a special and simple configuration obtained in this work. Then, the concise forms of the J-integral are derived and used to characterize the interfacial fracture behaviors associated with classical and shear deformation beam theories. The proposed approach may be considered as a promising candidate for the future standard mode-I test method of bimaterial systems due to its obvious accuracy, simplicity, and applicability, as demonstrated by the numerical and experimental results.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Standard DCB specimen and dissimilar DCB (hybrid joint)

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Figure 2

Equilibrium of an infinitesimal section of bonded joint

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Figure 3

Comparison of J with slender beam configuration

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Figure 4

Comparison of J with short beam configuration

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Figure 5

Distribution of local relative displacement of the proposed hybrid joint with h1/D1=h2/D2 by FEA

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Figure 6

Distribution of local interfacial stress of the proposed hybrid joint with h1/D1=h2/D2 by FEA

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Figure 7

Distribution of local relative displacement of the hybrid joint with h1=h2 and E2=9E1 by FEA

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Figure 8

Distribution of local interfacial stress of the hybrid joint with h1=h2 and E2=9E1 by FEA

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Figure 9

The proposed pure mode-I fracture test of two adhesively bonded dissimilar materials with mini-inclinometer and high resolution CCD camera

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Figure 10

Experimental relationships between crack tip normal opening w0 and tangential slip δ0 of three different groups of joints

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Figure 11

Experimental J-w0 relationships for Groups 1 and 3

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Figure 12

Experimental interfacial laws for Groups 1 and 3

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