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Technical Briefs

Constitutive Modeling of Electrostrictive Polymers Using a Hyperelasticity-Based Approach

[+] Author and Article Information
A. W. Richards

Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931

G. M. Odegard1

Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931

1

Corresponding author.

J. Appl. Mech 77(1), 014502 (Oct 05, 2009) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3173766 History: Received August 11, 2008; Revised April 13, 2009; Published October 05, 2009

The use of constitutive equations to describe the electromechanical behavior of electrostrictive materials began over 100 years ago. While these equations have been used to model a host of ceramic-based and polymer-based electroactive materials, a fully characterized model has not yet been developed to predict the response of transversely isotropic polymer electrostrictives. A constitutive model is developed within a thermodynamic and hyperelastic framework that incorporates the transversely isotropic material symmetry that is present in many polymer-based electrostrictives. The resulting constitutive model is characterized for three electrostrictive polymer systems using empirical data that are available in the literature. The model has a relatively simple functional form that is easily adaptable to other polymer electrostrictive material systems.

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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Schematic of the molecular chains in an unpolarized electrostrictive polymer

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Molecular structure of a polarized electrostrictive polymer (left) and the resulting bulk-level material symmetry (right)

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