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STABILIZED, MULTISCALE, AND MULTIPHYSICS METHODS IN FLUID MECHANICS

Computational Modeling of the Collapse of a Liquid Column Over an Obstacle and Experimental Validation

[+] Author and Article Information
Marcela A. Cruchaga

Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Avenida Libertador Bernardo O´Higgins 3363, Santiago, Chilemcruchag@lauca.usach.cl

Diego J. Celentano

Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica y Metalúrgica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Avenida Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Santiago, Chile

Tayfun E. Tezduyar

Team for Advanced Flow Simulation and Modeling (T*AFSM), Mechanical Engineering, Rice University, MS 321, Houston, TX 77005

J. Appl. Mech 76(2), 021202 (Jan 13, 2009) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.3057439 History: Received November 05, 2007; Revised July 18, 2008; Published January 13, 2009

We present the numerical and experimental analyses of the collapse of a water column over an obstacle. The physical model consists of a water column initially confined by a closed gate inside a glass box. An obstacle is placed between the gate and the right wall of the box, inside the initially unfilled zone. Once the gate is opened, the liquid spreads in the container and over the obstacle. Measurements of the liquid height along the walls and a middle control section are obtained from videos. The computational modeling is carried out using a moving interface technique, namely, the edge-tracked interface locator technique, to calculate the evolution of the water-air interface. The analysis involves a water-column aspect ratio of 2, with different obstacle geometries. The numerical predictions agree reasonably well with the experimental trends.

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Copyright © 2009 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic representation of the physical models (a) and geometry of obstacles ((b)(1) square section and (b)(2) trapezoidal section)

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Figure 2

Experimental and computed interfaces at different instants for the obstacle with a square cross section. Experimental and computed interfaces at different instants for the obstacle with a square cross section.

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Figure 3

Evolution, for the obstacle with a square cross section, of the dimensionless interface vertical position at the left wall (a), section at middle of the obstacle (b), and the right wall (c)

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Figure 4

Experimental and computed interfaces at different instants for the obstacle with a trapezoidal cross section. Experimental and computed interfaces at different instants for the obstacle with a trapezoidal cross section.

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Figure 5

Evolution, for the obstacle with a trapezoidal cross section, of the dimensionless interface vertical position at the left wall (a), section at middle of the obstacle (b), and the right wall (c)

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