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Special Issue Honoring Professor Fazil Erdogan’s Contributions to Mixed Boundary Value Problems of Inhomogeneous and Functionally Graded Materials

Effective Thermal Conductivity of Functionally Graded Particulate Nanocomposites With Interfacial Thermal Resistance

[+] Author and Article Information
H. M. Yin, W. G. Buttlar

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Newmark Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 205 North Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801

G. H. Paulino1

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Newmark Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 205 North Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801paulino@uiuc.edu

L. Z. Sun

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, 4139 Engineering Gateway, Irvine, CA 92697

1

Corresponding author.

J. Appl. Mech 75(5), 051113 (Jul 24, 2008) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2936893 History: Received September 24, 2007; Revised April 17, 2008; Published July 24, 2008

By means of a fundamental solution for a single inhomogeneity embedded in a functionally graded material matrix, a self-consistent model is proposed to investigate the effective thermal conductivity distribution in a functionally graded particulate nanocomposite. The “Kapitza thermal resistance” along the interface between a particle and the matrix is simulated with a perfect interface but a lower thermal conductivity of the particle. The results indicate that the effective thermal conductivity distribution greatly depends on Kapitza thermal resistance, particle size, and degree of material gradient.

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Copyright © 2008 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

A single spherical inhomogeneity in an FGM matrix subjected to a uniform heat flux field

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Figure 3

Effective thermal conductivity versus volume fraction for diamond/ZnS composites

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Figure 4

Predicted effective thermal conductivity versus volume fraction for diamond/ZnS FGMs with different particle sizes

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Figure 5

Predicted effective thermal conductivity versus volume fraction for C∕SiC FGMs with different “Kapitza thermal resistances”

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Illustration of a self-consistent model for FGMs: (a) FGM containing nanoparticles (black) dispersed in Phase B matrix (white), (b) Phase A particle embedded in the FGM itself with an interfacial thermal resistance, and (c) equivalent particle embedded in the FGM with a perfect interface and a lower thermal conductivity

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