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Research Papers

Fully Two-Dimensional Discrete Inverse Eigenstrain Analysis of Residual Stresses in a Railway Rail Head

[+] Author and Article Information
Xu Song

Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ, UKxu.song@eng.ox.ac.uk

Alexander M. Korsunsky

Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ, UK

J. Appl. Mech 78(3), 031019 (Feb 17, 2011) (6 pages) doi:10.1115/1.4003364 History: Received March 05, 2010; Revised December 14, 2010; Posted January 05, 2011; Published February 17, 2011; Online February 17, 2011

The aim of the present study was to introduce a new algorithm for reconstructing the eigenstrain fields in engineering components. A 2D discrete inverse eigenstrain study of residual stresses was carried out on a worn railhead sample. Its residual elastic strain distribution was obtained by neutron diffraction measurement in Stress-Spec, FRMII and used as the input for eigenstrain reconstruction. A new eigenstrain base function-tent was introduced to capture the fully two-dimensional variation of eigenstrain distribution. An automated sequential tent generation scheme was programed in ABAQUS ™ with its preprocessor to load the experimental data and postprocessor to carry out the optimization to obtain the eigenstrain coefficients. The reconstructed eigenstrain field incurs residual stress distribution in the railhead simulation, which showed good agreement with the experimental data.

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Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Illustration of two tent functions

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Figure 2

Experimental data grid points (numbered) and the interpolation of data to IP point P

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Figure 3

(a) Image of the rail head sample; (b) contour obtained by CMM for FE model geometry; (c) experimental data grid, with each point corresponding to the center of the gauge volume in neutron diffraction strain measurement

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Figure 4

(a) Illustration of a typical FE mesh used in the simulation; (b) Illustration of the tent grid

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Figure 5

Illustration of the criterion for point P belonging to the inside of a triangular element

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Figure 6

(a) An example of an eigenstrain “tent” base function introduced in the FE model. (b) The elastic strain response (horizontal component) to a single eigenstrain tent base function.

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Figure 7

(a)–(c) represent the experimental data for transverse (x), vertical (y), and longitudinal (z) residual elastic strain distributions; (d)–(f) represent the data imported from the experiment into the FE model; (g)–(i) are the reconstructed residual elastic strain distributions for the (x), (y), and (z) directions

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Figure 8

(a)–(c) represent the reconstructed eigenstrain distributions for transverse (x), vertical (y), and longitudinal (z) directions

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Figure 9

Relative positions of the three lines used for plotting. (a) Horizontal residual elastic strain profiles from eigenstrain reconstruction, experiment, and FE direct import at line 124. (b) Vertical residual elastic strain profiles from eigenstrain reconstruction, experiment, and FE direct import at line 124. (c) Horizontal residual elastic strain profiles from eigenstrain reconstruction, experiment, and FE direct import at line 138. (d) Vertical residual elastic strain profiles from eigenstrain reconstruction, experiment, and FE direct import at line 138. (e) Horizontal residual elastic strain profiles from eigenstrain reconstruction, experiment, and FE direct import at line 150. (f) Vertical residual elastic strain profiles from eigenstrain reconstruction, experiment, and FE direct import at line 150.

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