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TECHNICAL BRIEFS

Use of Near-Field Acoustic Levitation in Experimental Sliding Contact

[+] Author and Article Information
T. A. Stolarski

Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering and Design,  Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 3PH, United Kingdommesttas@brunel.ac.uk

C. I. Woolliscroft

Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Engineering and Design,  Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 3PH, United Kingdom

J. Appl. Mech 74(4), 816-820 (May 22, 2006) (5 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2424472 History: Received December 20, 2005; Revised May 22, 2006

The paper presents an investigation into producing the self-levitation effect using piezo-electric actuators (PZTs). Self-levitation has been demonstrated and results are presented and discussed. A relationship between the levitation distance and weight of the levitating sample has been found. In addition, the orientation and position of the PZTs has been found to affect the levitation distance. Modal shapes of the vibration plates used have been produced through modeling and found to accurately correlate with the experimental results found. Additional evidence suggests that the type of vibration plate material affects the separation distance, possibly due to the material’s properties of acoustic reflection.

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Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Piezoelectric driven plate and levitating sample

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Figure 2

Vibration plate with four PZTs bonded to the underside of the plate

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Figure 4

Graph of separation distance versus voltage across PZTs, for three orientations of the PZTs, at 25.6kHz

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Figure 5

The pattern of sugar upon the plate when resonating at 25.6kHz

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Figure 6

Modal shape of the plate at 25.955kHz

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Figure 7

Exaggerated model of the modal shape of the plate when excited to resonant frequency of 25.955kHz

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Figure 8

Contour plot of lateral displacement when in modal shape at frequency of 25.955kHz

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Figure 9

Separation distance versus total mass of levitating sample

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Figure 10

Separation distance versus inverse root of the total mass of the levitation object

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Figure 11

Separation distance versus applied voltage input for aluminium (1.9mm thickness), titanium (1.55mm thickness), and steel (1.1mm thickness) plates

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