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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Flow Analysis and Modeling of Field-Controllable, Electro- and Magneto-Rheological Fluid Dampers

[+] Author and Article Information
Xiaojie Wang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 98557

Faramarz Gordaninejad1

Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 98557faramarz@unr.edu

1

To whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Appl. Mech 74(1), 13-22 (Nov 29, 2005) (10 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2166649 History: Received January 26, 2004; Revised November 29, 2005

This study combines a fluid mechanics-based approach and the Herschel-Bulkley constitutive equation to develop a theoretical model for predicting the behavior of field-controllable, magneto-rheological (MR), and electro-rheological (ER) fluid dampers. The goal is to provide an accurate theoretical model for analysis, design, and development of control algorithms of MR/ER dampers. Simplified explicit expressions for closed-form solution of the pressure drop across a MR fluid valve are developed. The Herschel-Bulkley quasi-steady flow analysis is extended to include the effect of fluid compressibility to account for the nonlinear dynamic behavior of MR/ER fluid dampers. The advantage of this model is that it only depends on geometric and material properties of the MR/ER material and the device. The theoretical results are validated by an experimental study. It is demonstrated that the proposed model can effectively predict the nonlinear behavior of field-controllable fluid dampers.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Flow profile of a non-Newtonian fluid through a uniform circular or parallel plate cross section

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Figure 2

Experimental and theoretical force-velocity results of UNR MRD-001 damper for a sinusoidal motion at frequency of 0.5Hz and 1.016cm amplitude

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Figure 3

Schematic of the MR channel flow experimental setup

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Figure 4

Theoretical and experimental pressure drop-velocity results for the piston-driven MR channel flow for a sinusoidal motion at frequency of 0.5Hz and 1.05cm amplitude

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Figure 5

Schematic of the prototype UNR MRD-001 MR fluid damper

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Figure 6

Schematic of the flow path trough the UNR MRD-001 MR fluid damper

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Figure 7

Shear stress versus shear strain rate data at various magnetic field strengths

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Figure 8

Comparisons between the proposed model and experimental results for a sinusoidal motion at 1.0Hz and 1.016cm(0.4in) amplitude at 1.0Amps electric current input. The effective bulk modulus is β=4.0×108N∕m2.

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Figure 9

Comparisons between the proposed model and experimental results for a sinusoidal motion at 1.0Hz and 1.016cm(0.4in) amplitude at 1.5Amps electric current input. The effective bulk modulus is β=4.0×108N∕m2.

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Figure 10

Comparisons between the proposed model and experimental results for a sinusoidal motion at 1.0Hz and 1.016cm(0.4in) amplitude at 2.0Amps electric current input. The effective bulk modulus is β=4.0×108N∕m2.

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Figure 11

Comparisons between the proposed model and experimental results for a sinusoidal motion at 1.0Hz and 1.016cm(0.4in) amplitude at three different electric current input in time domain. The effective bulk modulus is β=4.0×108N∕m2.

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Figure 12

Experimental results for hysteresis of UNR MRD-001 MR fluid damper subjected to 0.0, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0A input electric currents and harmonic motion at 1.0Hz and 0.267cm amplitude

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Figure 13

Theoretical results for hysteresis of UNR MRD-001 MR fluid damper subjected to 0.0, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0A input electric currents and harmonic motion at 1.0Hz and 0.267cm amplitude (β=5.5×107N∕m2)

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Figure 14

Time history of input displacement and applied control voltage

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Figure 15

Comparison between the theoretical model and experimental results

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