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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Evolution of the Upper Crustal Deformation in Subduction Zones

[+] Author and Article Information
Javier Quinteros

Laboratorio de Tectónica Andina, Departamento de Geología, Facultad de Cs. Exactas y Naturales – UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentinajquinte@dc.uba.ar

Pablo M. Jacovkis

Departamento de Computación and Instituto de Cálculo, Facultad de Cs. Exactas y Naturales – UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentinajacovkis@dc.uba.ar

Victor A. Ramos

Laboratorio de Tectónica Andina, Departamento de Geología, Facultad de Cs. Exactas y Naturales – UBA, Buenos Aires, Argentina

J. Appl. Mech 73(6), 984-994 (Apr 17, 2006) (11 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2204962 History: Received June 27, 2005; Revised April 17, 2006

The uplift and evolution of a noncollisional orogen developed along a subduction zone, such as the Andean system, is a direct consequence of the interrelation between plate tectonic stresses and erosion. Tectonic stresses are related to the convergence velocity and thermal state, among other causes. In this paper, a new model designed to investigate the evolution of the topography and the upper crustal deformation of noncollisional orogens in a subduction zone produced by the oceanic crust being subducted is presented. The mechanical behavior of the crust was modeled by means of finite elements methods to solve Stokes equations for a strain-rate-dependent viscoplastic rheology. The model takes into account erosion effects using interface-tracking methods to assign fictitious properties to nonmaterial elements.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 6

Example of topography calculated by tectonic stresses before and after the isostatic compensation

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Figure 7

Boundary conditions

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Figure 8

Viscosity at the beginning of the simulation

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Figure 9

Strain rate at the beginning of the simulation

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Figure 10

Strain rate at 3, 7, 11, and 15My from the beginning

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Figure 11

Topography and surface erosion at 3, 7, 11, and 15My from the beginning

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Figure 12

Topography, precipitation, and available water flux calculated by the model at approximately middle Miocene (12My)

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Figure 1

Schematic graphic of a subduction zone

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Figure 2

Geometry of the vertical section and mesh used

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Figure 3

Temperature distribution at the beginning of simulation

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Figure 4

Interfaces defined in the model to represent the surface and the Benioff zone

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Figure 5

Deformation of a beam cross section

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