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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Ultrasonic Field Modeling in Multilayered Fluid Structures Using the Distributed Point Source Method Technique

[+] Author and Article Information
Sourav Banerjee

Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721souravban@netscape.net

Tribikram Kundu1

Department of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721tkundu@email.arizona.edu

Dominique Placko

 Ecole Normale Superieure, SATIE, 62, av. Du President Wilson, F-94235 Cachan cedex, Francedominique.plcko@satie.ens-cachan.fr

1

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

J. Appl. Mech 73(4), 598-609 (Oct 20, 2005) (12 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2164516 History: Received February 23, 2005; Revised October 20, 2005

In the field of nondestructive evaluation (NDE), the newly developed distributed point source method (DPSM) is gradually gaining popularity. DPSM is a semi-analytical technique used to calculate the ultrasonic field (pressure and velocity fields) generated by ultrasonic transducers. This technique is extended in this paper to model the ultrasonic field generated in multilayered nonhomogeneous fluid systems when the ultrasonic transducers are placed on both sides of the layered fluid structure. Two different cases have been analyzed. In the first case, three layers of nonhomogeneous fluids constitute the problem geometry; the higher density fluid is sandwiched between two identical fluid half-spaces. In the second case, four layers of nonhomogeneous fluids have been considered with the fluid density monotonically increasing from the bottom to the top layer. In both cases, analyses have been carried out for two different frequencies of excitation with various orientations of the transducers. As expected, the results show that the ultrasonic field is very sensitive to the fluid properties, the orientation of the fluid layers, and the frequency of excitation. The interaction effect between the transducers is also visible in the computed results. In the pictorial view of the resulting ultrasonic field, the interface between two fluid layers can easily be seen.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

(a) Position of an observation point (target point) and its distance from the mth point source on the transducer surface. (b) Side view of a transducer and actual positions of the point sources.

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Figure 2

Rotation of the transducer with respect to x3-axis and velocity of the nth observation point adjacent to the transducer face

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Figure 3

Distribution of point sources in the multilayered fluid system with two transducers and n different fluids having (n−1) interfaces

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Figure 4

Multilayered fluid structures considered: (a) case 1, water-glycerin-water; (b) case 2, acetone-benzol-water-glycerin.

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Figure 5

Transducer orientations (a) orientation I; (b) orientation II; (c) orientation III; (d) orientation IV.

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Figure 6

Ultrasonic fields for case 1. (a) Orientation I for 1MHz transducers with only R on. (b) Orientation III for 1MHz transducers with only R on. (c) Orientation I for 1MHz transducers with both T and R on. (d) Orientation I for 2.2MHz transducers with only R on. (e) Orientation III for 2.2MHz transducers with only R on. (f) Orientation I for 2.2MHz transducers with both T and R on.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Ultrasonic fields for case 1. (a) Orientation IV for 1MHz transducers with only R on. (b) Orientation IV for 1MHz transducers with both T and R on. (c) Orientation II for 1MHz transducers with both T and R on. (d) Orientation IV for 2.2MHz transducers with only R on. (e) Orientation IV for 2.2MHz transducers with both T and R on. (f) Orientation II for 2.2MHz transducers with both T and R on.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Ultrasonic fields for case 2. (a) Orientation I for 1MHz transducers with only R on. (b) Orientation I for 1MHz transducers with only T on. (c) Orientation I for 1MHz transducers with both T and R on. (d) Orientation I for 2.2MHz transducers with only R on. (e) Orientation I for 2.2MHz transducers with only T on. (f) Orientation I for 2.2MHz transducers with both T and R on.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Ultrasonic fields for case 2. (a) Orientation IV for 1MHz transducers with only R on. (b) Orientation IV for 1MHz transducers with both T and R on. (c) Orientation II for 1MHz transducers with both T and R on. (d) Orientation IV for 2.2MHz transducers with only R on. (e) Orientation IV for 2.2MHz transducers with both T and R on. (f) Orientation II for 2.2MHz transducers with both T and R on.

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