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TECHNICAL BRIEFS

Modeling Flow of a Biviscous Fluid From Borehole Into Rock Fracture

[+] Author and Article Information
A. Lavrov

 SINTEF Petroleum Research, Formation Physics Department, 7465 Trondheim, Norwayalexandre.lavrov@iku.sintef.no

J. Appl. Mech 73(1), 171-173 (Mar 09, 2005) (3 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2061927 History: Received July 22, 2004; Revised March 09, 2005

Flow of bi-viscous fluid, i.e., non-Newtonian fluid with the shear stress versus shear rate function composed of two straight segments, from a borehole into a nonpropagating deformable horizontal fracture of circular shape was modeled within the lubrication approximation. The volume of the fluid lost into the fracture was found to be an almost-linearly decreasing function of the fluid yield stress and a linearly increasing function of the borehole pressure, under assumption of linear fracture deformation law. The model developed serves as a first approximation of mud loss during drilling of low-permeability naturally fractured rocks.

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Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Fluid loss dynamics for two fluids: Newtonian (yield stress 0) and non-Newtonian bi-viscous (yield stress 10 Pa). Values of other parameters are the same for both curves and are given in the text.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Total volume of fluid lost within the first 2000 s as a function of the fluid yield stress. Values of parameters are given in the text.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Fluid loss dynamics for two borehole pressure values, 22 and 26 MPa. Values of other parameters are the same for both curves and are given in the text.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Total volume of fluid lost within the first 2000 s as a function of borehole pressure. Values of other parameters are given in the text.

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