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TECHNICAL PAPERS

Evolution of Wrinkles in Elastic-Viscoelastic Bilayer Thin Films

[+] Author and Article Information
S. H. Im

Center for Mechanics of Solids, Structures and Materials, Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, The University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712

R. Huang

Center for Mechanics of Solids, Structures and Materials, Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, The University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712ruihuang@mail.utexas.edu

J. Appl. Mech 72(6), 955-961 (Mar 24, 2005) (7 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2043191 History: Received May 23, 2003; Revised March 24, 2005

This paper develops a model for evolving wrinkles in a bilayer thin film consisting of an elastic layer and a viscoelastic layer. The elastic layer is subjected to a compressive residual stress and is modeled by the nonlinear von Karman plate theory. A thin-layer approximation is developed for the viscoelastic layer. The stability of the bilayer and the evolution of wrinkles are studied first by a linear perturbation analysis and then by numerical simulations. Three stages of the wrinkle evolution are identified: initial growth of the fastest growing mode, intermediate growth with mode transition, and, finally, an equilibrium wrinkle state.

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Copyright © 2005 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Figures

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Figure 1

Schematic of an elastic-viscoelastic bilayer on a rigid substrate: (a) the reference state and (b) a wrinkled state

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Figure 2

Initial growth rate as a function of wavelength by the linear perturbation analysis, for various ratios between the rubbery modulus of the viscoelastic layer and the Young’s modulus of the elastic layer

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Figure 3

Evolution of the lateral deflection w and the in-plane displacement u by numerical simulation with a sinusoidal initial perturbation

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Figure 4

Amplitude of a sinusoidal wrinkle as a function of time

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Figure 5

Numerical simulation of evolving wrinkles with a random initial perturbation. The left column shows the deflection of the elastic layer, and the right column shows the corresponding Fourier spectra.

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Figure 6

Evolution of the dominant wrinkle wavelength by numerical simulation: (a) short time evolution and (b) long time evolution

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Figure 7

The root mean square (RMS) of the wrinkle as a function of time: (a) short-time evolution and (b) long-time evolution

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